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  |  March 13: Colloquium series lecture focuses on role of Cardinal Richelieu
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March 13: Colloquium series lecture focuses on role of Cardinal Richelieu

Thursday, March 13, 2014

FREDERICK, Md.—The Hood College humanities colloquium series will continue its spring schedule with a lecture on the role of Cardinal Richelieu in the creation of a French modern identity.

Jean-Vincent Blanchard, associate professor of French at Swarthmore College, will give a talk entitled Richelieu: Machiavellian Despite Himself March 26 at 7 p.m. in the seminar room in Coblentz Hall, preceded by a reception at 6:30 p.m.

Blanchard is the author of an acclaimed biography of Richelieu, Éminence: Cardinal Richelieu and the Rise of France, and is working on the story of Hubert Lyautey, the first resident-general of the French protectorate of Morocco. He has written two other books, The Optics of Discourse and The Implausibility of Power, and haspublished articles on a broad range of subjects in politics, history and the arts.

Chief Minister to King Louis XIII, Cardinal Richelieu was a French clergyman, noble and statesman. Consecrated as a bishop in 1608, he later entered politics, becoming secretary of state in 1615. He is widely known as the architect of a new France in the 17th century and the force behind the nation's rise as a European power. One of the first statesmen to clearly understand the necessity of a balance of powers, Richelieu is often credited with introducing a modern approach to international relations.

The final spring colloquium event, which this year focuses on the topic The Worlds of Machievelli, will be a panel discussion and film screening April 21 that focuses on the historical and political significance of Richard III.

The event is co-sponsored with Hood's department of foreign languages and literatures.

For more information about the colloquium series, contact Katy Fulfer, NEH/Libman professor of the humanities, at fulfer@hood.edu.