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Time and Memory is theme of this year's Colloquium series

Friday, August 24, 2012

FREDERICK, Md.—The nation's tradition and history of preserving and commemorating the birthplaces of its national heroes will be the topic of a lecture Sept. 19 at 7 p.m. in the Marx Center at Hood College.

The event opens the College's annual Center for the Humanities colloquium series, which is funded in part by a National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant.

Seth C. Bruggeman is an assistant professor of history and American studies at Temple University, where he also directs its Center for Public History. He is the author of Here, George Washington Was Born: Memory, Material Culture, and the Public History of a National Monument, and editor of Born in the USA: Birth and Commemoration in American Public Memory. His recent research focuses on the history of maritime museums.

Future colloquium events include the Sept. 24 screening of Au Revoir les Enfants, a prize-winning film by celebrated French director Louis Malle, which offers a dramatic portrait of life in Nazi-occupied France; a lecture Oct. 31 by Dan Cohen, MSW, executive director of Music and Memory, who will discuss the therapeutic potential of digital technology and personalized music for patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia; a lecture Nov. 8 by Camilla Townsend, Ph.D., professor of history at Rutgers University, who reexamines the familiar depiction of Pocahontas routinely recounted in historical narratives about colonial Virginia; and a lecture Dec. 4 by Patricia Hart, Ph.D., professor of Spanish and director of film studies at Purdue University, who explores the representation of trauma and memory in contemporary Spanish cinema.

This year's colloquium, themed Time and Memory, explores the nature of time and memory and how these concepts have been understood through the ages. Through lectures, symposia, readings and other events, the Colloquium considers topics relating to the science of chronology; time and historical consciousness; cultural memory; memories of trauma; and representations of memory in narratives, oral history and material culture.

The Hood College Center for the Humanities was founded in 1990 by a group of faculty members from Hood's humanities departments—art, English, foreign languages, history and political science, music, philosophy and religion. During its more than 20-year existence, the Center for the Humanities has presented a distinguished roster of events and hosted internationally renowned speakers. In 1999, Hood was the recipient of a major challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, which helps provide for an annual lecture series and an NEH visiting scholar.

For more information, contact Rebecca Prime, Ph.D., Sophia M. Libman NEH Professor of the Humanities, at prime@hood.edu.