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Courses Offered

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ART 201 Meaning and Method in Art (CORE—Art, Music, Film or Other Media)

(First semester/4 credits)

An analytical inquiry into the modes and media of visual culture, focused especially on the challenge of contemporary art. Drawing upon examples from ancient building to oil painting to advertisement to video, the focus will be on the nature and variety of expression and interpretation. Active looking, reading, and discussion will be paramount.

ART 215 Introduction to Museum Studies

(Course is offered as needed/4 credits)

Introduction to the histories, types, functions and meanings of museums, focused particularly on the art museum. Through reading, discussion, lectures, independent assignments and field trips to major museums in the Washington-Baltimore area, we will consider the many sorts of collections, contexts and displays involved in museums, as well as political and social issues involved in running museums today.

ART 221 History of Art II (CORE—Art, Music, Film, or Other Media)

(Second semester/4 credits)

An introduction to painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the modern era in Western Europe and the United States. Emphasis on major artists and movements, the cultural context of art, changes in modes of artistic expression over time, and issues of gender in art.

ART 275 The Art of Film: History and Technique (CORE—Art, Music, Film or Other Media)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101, or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (Offered as needed /4 credits)

This survey course provides an introduction to film aesthetics (cinematography, editing, sound, etc.) and formal structure (narrative, documentary, experimental) along with the historical, social, and theoretical contexts that shape our understanding of film art. We will also trace the history of cinema from its origins in the late 19th century through to the present day. Our discussion will focus on developments in American cinema, with consideration given to concurrent trends in world cinema.

ART 299 Special Topics in Art

(Offered as needed/4 credits)

This course will consider special topics of interest to students and faculty in the fields of art history and archaeology. Topics will vary.

 

ART 300 Gallery Management

Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and permission or invitation of Department of Art and Archaeology. (Both semesters/2 credits—may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits) 

Practicum in methods and techniques of art gallery management. Under faculty supervision, students will serve as assistant curators of art exhibits in Hodson Gallery. Students will follow structured gallery procedures to facilitate the exhibition program.

 

ART 304 American Art

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of the instructor. (Course is offered as needed/3 credits) 

American art considered in its historical context, both in its own right and as related to European artistic developments. Emphasis on varieties of artistic production and modes of judgment or evaluation.

 

ART 305 The Youngest Art: The History of Photography (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of the instructor. (Course is offered as needed/4 credits)

This course will consider the origin, development, and variety of photography as used throughout the world, from its invention to the present. Students will also become acquainted with contemporary critical and interpretive approaches to photography. Lecture, discussion and independent analysis of selected topics, readings and images. Students will have opportunity to produce both visual art and written projects.

 

 

ART 308 Myths, Saints, and Symbols (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 220 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits) 

A study of subject matter in art, especially subjects taken from classical mythology and the Old and New Testaments.

 

ARHN 319 Orientalism and Egyptomania: Rediscovering and Remaking the Ancient Middle East (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Open to juniors or seniors in the Honors Program and art majors and minors or by permission of the instructor. (First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

This class will examine the rediscovery and representation of Egypt and related lands in the Middle East during the 19th and 20th century by artists, travelers and related figures. We will consider visual and literary sources of many kinds, from the lands of the Middle East and the Western cultures of discoverers.

 

ARRL 330 Archaeology of Ancient Israel

Prerequisite: ART 220 or HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—even years/4 credits)

This course examines the development of cultures in and around the modern country of Israel, from the Neolithic Age through the end of the Iron Age (c. 12,000-586 B.C.). In it, we will focus on the archaeology of Israel/Palestine and its neighbors, and on how scholars reconstruct their social, economic, religious, and political institutions. We will use evidence from archaeological sites and surveys, as well as written documents from Israel (including the Old Testament) and surrounding areas. It is important to keep an open mind and use analytical skills in order to assess these often conflicting sources of data. Though this course will not go into later, New Testament times, it will offer students a context into which they can fit their readings of both the Old and New Testaments.

ART 332 Aegean Archaeology

Prerequisite: ART 220 or HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—odd years/ 4 credits)

This course examines the development of cultures in and around the Aegean Sea (Greece, Crete, the Cycladic islands and coastal Turkey) from the Neolithic Age through the end of the Bronze Age (c. 10,000-1,000 B.C.). Traces the rise and collapse of the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures, their artistic and material expressions and their associated social, economic, religious and political institutions.

ART 335 Teaching Assistantship in Art

Prerequisite: Invitation of the department. (Either semester/1 or 2 credits—may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits) 

An opportunity for qualified seniors to serve as teaching assistants in studio art, art history and visual media courses. Responsibilities may include tutoring, holding review sessions, attending field trips, assisting in grading tests and other duties defined by the instructor. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

ART 340 Art of Prehistory (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 220 or HIST 262 or INST 312 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—odd years/4 credits)

Traces the development of human culture and civilization, as expressed in artistic and archaeological evidence, from the origins of modern humans through the advent of agriculture and urbanism around the world. Special attention to artistic expression as a medium for communication and change. The geographic areas discussed in this course include Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas.

ART 349 Art of Egypt and Mesopotamia (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 220 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

An examination of the architecture, sculpture, painting and other arts of the major early civilizations of the Near East, from the Neolithic to c. 500 B.C. The artistic production of these cultures will be considered in its historical and social contexts. Competing theories on such developments as the origins of agriculture and the introduction of writing will be discussed and assessed. Special emphasis on the interconnections between these cultures, as well as their points of divergence.

 

ART 350 Classical Art and Archaeology (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 220 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—odd years/ 4 credits)

This course examines the artistic production and archaeological discovery of the classical age – from the emergence of Greek culture after the Bronze Age to the reign of Constantine (Rome’s first Christian emperor). Both the technological innovations and stylistic developments characteristic of this period are studied in the major genres of visual representation: painting, sculpture, architecture, mosaic, and the decorative arts. The placement of these objects and monuments within their cultural context is emphasized, with the ultimate goal being a theoretical understanding of the function(s) of art within classical cultures. In-class discussion of primary and secondary sources for the study of ancient history, art, and culture is expected. Finally, students can explore the impact of classical art and culture on later periods of western civilization, as well as issues of archaeology and cultural property.

 

ART 351 Medieval Art

Prerequisite: ART 220 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—odd years/ 3 credits) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from the late Roman empire through the Gothic period. Emphasis on the function and meaning of images and their social and ideological contexts in western Europe and Byzantium. Field trips to the Walters Art Gallery, Dumbarton Oaks and the National Cathedral.

 

ART 352 Northern Renaissance Art

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—as needed/3 credits) 

Painting in Northern Europe from the art of the French courts in the late 13th century through the 16th century in the Netherlands and Germany. Field trips to the Walters Art Gallery and the National Gallery of Art.

 

ART 353 Early Renaissance Art (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/ 4 credits)

Painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy, especially Tuscany, from the early 13th century until the late 15th century. Topics include civic, religious and private patronage, the changing status of the artist and humanism and the arts. Field trips to the Walters Art Gallery and the National Gallery of Art.

 

ART 355 Art of Asia (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation section of the Core. (First semester—odd years/4 credits)

An introduction to the history of art and architecture of South and East Asia, with an emphasis on India, China and Japan. Consideration of key artworks from each culture and their styles, themes and techniques; includes discussions of gender, ethnicity, class and ideology in the making and viewing of Asian art.

ART 356 Art of Japan (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation section of the Core. (First semester—as needed/4 credits)

This course is a chronological survey of the history of the arts and architecture of Japan. It examines the characteristic styles and themes employed by secular and religious arts in successive periods, and will introduce the student to major masters, key monuments and important aesthetic concepts of Japanese art. Among the issues to be considered are Japan’s cultural relations with her neighbors and the impact of social values and institutions upon artistic production.

 

ART 357 High Renaissance and Mannerist Art (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 220 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—as needed/4 credits)

Through the works of artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and their Venetian counterparts, this course will examine the major developments in Italian art from 1480 until 1580. It will explore a range of artistic and cultural issues, including the notion of artistic genius, the relationship between the study of nature and artistic invention and the changing status of the visual arts. Close attention will also be given to the political and religious contexts.

 

ART 358 Baroque Art

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—as needed/4 credits)

European art and architecture of the 17th and 18th centuries. Selected treatment of style, subject matter, medium and context of an art in the age of kings, courts, academies and emergent nations. Slide lectures and discussion, with a field trip to the National Gallery of Art.

 

ART 360 19th Century Art

Prerequisite: ART 221. (First semester—odd years/4 credits)

Art and society in Europe and America from the French Revolution to the First World War. Topics include the development of a “modern” visual idiom, rise in status of the artist, the emergence of museums and galleries, invention and role of photography and new building technologies. Lecture, discussion, opportunity for independent research and field trip to a major collection.

ART 361 20th-Century Art

European and American art from the 20th century with a strong emphasis on the cultural, social, and political context in which this art was produced. Emphasis is on the overarching themes of Modernism and Postmodernism and topics such as the avant-garde, nationalism, globalization, consumerism, race, gender, class and ethnicity.

ART 362 Rome and Hollywood (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: A course in film and/or the ancient world (art, history, literature) or permission of the instructor. (Offered as needed/4 credits)

This course focuses on the interpretation of popular and artistic representations of Roman history and society in the modern medium of cinema. This course will consider some of the most imaginative American, British and Italian films recreating ancient Rome, from the epics of the silent era to modern television documentaries and blockbusters.

 

ART 363 Roman Art and Culture (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Junior standing and ART 220 or HIST 365 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

This course aims to introduce the basic themes of Roman art and culture within a standard chronological framework. Starting with the precursors of Roman culture (the Villanovans, Etruscans, and Greeks), and ending with the transition to the Byzantine period, this course will consider the visual media (sculpture, painting, mosaic, architecture, inscriptions, and the decorative arts) that the Romans used to express cultural ideals and imperial authority, and to define themselves to the outside world. This course also focuses on the representation of Romans and the use of Roman art in modern media, from news reports on recent archaeological discoveries to children’s books and Hollywood movies.

ART 370 Archaeological Fieldwork

Prerequisites: 12 credits in art at the 200 level or above, and permission of the archaeology concentration coordinator. May be repeated. (Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course offers the opportunity to learn archaeological field methods through hands- on experience at an archaeological site selected in collaboration between the student and archaeology concentration coordinator. Students are expected to observe and learn both survey and excavation techniques, as well as participating in recording, drawing and analyzing finds.

 

ART 371 Themes in Art History

Prerequisites: ART 220, 221 or permission of the instructor. (Either semester/4 credits)

Advanced topics in art history. A chance to pursue in more detail subjects only touched upon in large survey courses.

 

ART 375 Independent Study

Prerequisites: for theory and studio, 9 credits in art theory and studio courses; for art history, 9 credits in art history or permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors with instructor’s permission. (Either semester/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

Independent study in theory and studio or art history.

 

ART 399 Internship in Art and Archaeology

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or minors; permission of the department required. (Either semester/3-15 credits) 

Supervised off-campus internship experience in an institution approved by the department. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

ART 470/570 Seminar: Topics in Art and Archaeology

Prerequisites: Three courses in art history at the 200 level or above or permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors only. (Second semester/4 credits)

This capstone course will be dedicated to various important subjects in art history, archaeology and visual culture. Part will be devoted to lecture and discussion of key readings, images and objects, part to the presentation and consideration of directed research by students.

ART 471 Advanced Archaeological Fieldwork

Prerequisites: Art 370 and permission of the archaeology concentration coordinator. May be repeated. (Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course is designed for students with some initial experience in archaeological fieldwork, who would like to pursue more in-depth studies in field methods. It offers the opportunity to gain greater hands-on experience at an archaeological site selected in collaboration between the student and archaeology concentration coordinator. Students will be expected to acquire one or more advanced archaeological skills, which may include survey and excavation techniques, site and project supervision, as well as participating in recording, drawing and analyzing finds.

 

ART 372 Arts of the Non-Western World (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: ART 201, ART 220 or ART 221. (First semester/4 credits)

This course allows students to focus on topics and media not featured in broader survey courses of Non-Western art and culture. Courses will feature analysis of major works of Non-Western art, placing these works and their artists in their historical and cultural contexts and exploring the relationships between the artistic outputs of different cultures.

ART 320 Women and Art: Artists,Subjects,Patrons and Scholars

Prerequisites: One of the following: Art 220, Art 221, WMST 200 or permission of the instructor (Second semester/Even years/3 credits) 

This course will examine the variety of ways women have influenced the making and study of art, from the moment of creation to the display and analysis of the work in museum or text. Chronological and cultural focus of the course will vary depending on instructor, but readings and assignments will implement primary source materials produced by female artists and patrons, as well as secondary texts on feminist theory and reception.

 

ART 331 Museum, Sites and Cities

Prerequisite: Participation in instructor-led research trip and permission of the instructor (As needed/4 credits)

Following a January Term or summer research trip offered by department faculty, students in this course will delve more deeply into history, theory, and methodology in studio art, art history, museum studies, and/or archaeology based on their recent visit to seminal museums, sites, or cities. Students will be expected to apply the knowledge and insight gained by the travel experience to analytical reading and discussion, and to an extensive research paper, presentation, visual art series, or other similar advanced assignments.

ART 469/569 Advanced Topics in Archaeology

Prerequisites: ART 220 and two courses in art history at the 300-level; open to juniors and seniors only (First semester/4 credits)

This seminar course will be devoted to various important subjects in archaeology. Part will be slide lecture and discussion, including discussions led by students, and part will be presentation of directed research by students. Topics will be issues of concern to professional archaeologists today; possible topics include archaeological ethics; religion and archaeology; ceramics and archaeology; and science in archaeology.

ARTS 101 Design

A foundation course in the basic concepts underlying the visual arts. Students will study the principles of two- and three-dimensional design through exercises and through critical analysis of works of art. Lectures and discussion of concepts during class hours, execution of design projects during studio hours. Students concentrating in studio art and others wishing to pursue studio courses should take this course prior to, or concurrently with ARTS 123. 

ARTS 123 Drawing I

Prerequisite: ARTS 101 recommended, not required. May be taken concurrently with ARTS 101. (Summer and both semesters/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Introduction to basic concepts of drawing, developing individual skills and providing practice in using various drawing materials. Problems are given in landscape, still-life, figure study and other subject matter. Representational and abstract approaches are used.

ARTS 203 Ceramics I

(Both semesters/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

General survey of ceramics in which aesthetic and scientific aspects are considered. The Ceramics I course will incorporate information about clay, clay preparation, glazes and glazing techniques and kiln technology, with emphasis on handbuilding techniques. Through a progression of experiences, the student will understand the basic nature of clay, demonstrate the techniques necessary for successful clay construction, utilize a variety of decoration techniques and exhibit the technical knowledge necessary to fire the work, producing finished, glazed pieces for critique. Emphasis will be placed on design and construction and the overall aesthetics of the finished work.

ARTS 211 Digital Photography

Prerequisite: ARTS 101. Not open to students who have completed ARTS 214 (Both semesters/ 3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Fundamentals of the photographic medium and its possibilities for visual arts are prime considerations. The course objectives are to master basic camera operations, acquire technical and creative photographic skills and develop a working understanding of pixel-based photography in the digital darkroom. Students must supply their own digital cameras and the cost of materials.

ARTS 214 Darkroom Photography

Prerequisite: ARTS 101. Not open to students who have completed ARTS 211. (Second semester/ 3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Fundamentals of the photographic medium and its possibilities for visual arts are prime considerations. The course objectives are to master basic camera operations, acquire technical and creative photographic skills and develop a working understanding of the traditional darkroom/film based photography. Students must supply their own single lens reflex cameras and the cost of materials.

ARTS 224 Drawing II

Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and 123. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

A continuation of Drawing I, emphasizing a broad approach to drawing concepts. Representational and abstract approaches to a variety of subjects, including consideration of the figure.

ARTS 226 Digital Arts

Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and 123. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

In this course, students will learn to create digital images as well as a web portfolio of these images. They will build on the creative experiences introduced in their design and drawing courses. Using Adobe Photoshop and other web design software, students will gain experience in freehand drawing, digital painting, collage with scanned objects and website design.

ARTS 234 Relief Printmaking I

Prerequisite: ARTS 101. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Introduction to relief methods: linocut, woodblock, collograph and experimental techniques. Topics include mixing and manipulating inks, hand printing and use of a printing press.

ARTS 235 Monotype Printmaking I

Prerequisite: ARTS 101. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

An introductory course designed to teach students monotype printmaking. Students will create prints from various matrixes including plexiglass, wood, styrofoam and collograph plates. Additive and subtractive techniques will be taught. Topics include: mixing and manipulating inks, handprinting and use of a mechanized press. Students will refine skills of design and color theory. A coherent body of work will be compiled and a strong individual aesthetic will be formed.

ARTS 237 Painting I

Prerequisite: ARTS 101. ARTS 123 is recommended but not required. (Summer and second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Problems in figurative, objective and nonobjective painting. Consideration is given to theories of color, pictorial structure and materials and techniques. Students are required to purchase their own supplies.

ARTS 303 Ceramic Wheel

Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and ARTS 203, or permission of the instructor. (Both semesters/3 credits/ lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

A classical introduction to the potter’s wheel, the course will cover wedging, centering, throwing, shaping, trimming and aesthetics. The course will also incorporate information about clay, clay preparation, glazes and glazing techniques and kiln technology. Through a progression of experiences, personal research and practice, the student will demonstrate the ability to create open and vertical forms at the potter’s wheel, understand the basic nature of clay and the techniques necessary for throwing and trimming, and produce finished, glazed pieces for critique.

Students completing this course will acquire knowledge of the methods used to create wheel-thrown pottery, the characteristics of clay and glazes, the process of firing and an understanding of basic ceramic composition.

ARTS 304 Ceramics: Sculpture/Handbuilding

Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and ARTS 203. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Through a progression of experiences, including individual sketches and projects, the student will combine the construction methods of handbuilding to take a sculptural direction. Students completing this course will acquire knowledge of the methods used for creating with clay, the characteristics of clay and glazes, the process of firing and an understanding of ceramic composition for the sculptural form.

ARTS 311 Photography II

Prerequisites: ARTS 211 for the digital option, ARTS 214 for the darkroom option, or permission of instructor. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Provides a further development of artistic photography principles and creative laboratory techniques. Students have the option to select either a digital or a darkroom laboratory process to complete their portfolio. For either option, the student will complete field projects that explore advanced photography concepts and apply these concepts to projects to demonstrate imaginative image making in the field and in the laboratory.

ARTS 312 Photography III

Prerequisite: ARTS 311. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Students complete an independent, self motivated field project of their own choosing that explores advanced photography and laboratory concepts to be applied toward the development of a personal portfolio of fine art work. Students will continue with the same portfolio methodology (digital or darkroom) that they used in ARTS 311.

ARTS 314 Relief Printmaking II

Prerequisite: ARTS 234. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

An intermediate course designed to support an in depth study of relief techniques introduced in ARTS 234. The focus will be the continued development of subject, content and composition together with the supporting technical mastery in this printmaking domain. Emphasis will be on creating multiple color editions. Students may choose to work in linoleum or woodblock.

ARTS 315 Monotype Printmaking II

Prerequisite: ARTS 235. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

An intermediate course designed to support an in depth study of monotype techniques introduced in ARTS 235. The focus will be the continued development of subject, content and composition together with the supporting technical mastery in this printmaking domain. Topics to include: multiple color reductive prints, multiple color additive prints, frottage, stencils, collagraphic monotypes and heat transfers.

ARTS 316 Selected Topics in Studio Art

Prerequisites: ARTS 101, 3 additional studio credits or permission of the instructor. (Both semesters/3 credits/4 class and studio hours) 

An opportunity for students to study specific studio art topics not included in the regular course offerings. Topics may be selected from one or more of the following areas: drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, photography, printmaking. Offered at the discretion of the department.

ARTS 322 Photojournalism

Prerequisites: CMA 201 or ARTS 211 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

This course is intended to introduce students to the communication field of photojournalism. Defined as communicating through photography, photojournalism has historically been viewed as a very powerful tool in documenting the world around us. From community events, conflicts around the world, the political arena, high school through professional sports and the environment, photojournalists are empowered to show to their audience events that affect their daily lives. Truth and accuracy are the keys to good photojournalism.

ARTS 324 Drawing III

Prerequisites: ARTS 224 and at least 6 additional credits in studio art at or above the 200 level, or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Advanced study in drawing materials and techniques are explored in this course. Composition and the study of the figure will be emphasized.

ARTS 334 Advanced Printmaking

Prerequisites: ARTS 314 and/or ARTS 315 (Both semesters/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

This advanced printmaking course is designed to meet the needs of students concentrating in the area of printmaking. Students will refine their printmaking aesthetic and focus on individual projects advancing their technical skills. Topics include: sculptural forms, non- traditional bookmaking and contemporary print aesthetics.

ARTS 338 Painting II

Prerequisite: ARTS 237. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Advanced problems with further reference to the development of personal expression. Content, composition, spatial relationships and color theory are stressed within a contemporary context.

ARTS 339 Painting III

Prerequisite: ARTS 338. (First semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Individual painting projects facilitating the development of a personal idiom. Traditional as well as modern synthetic mixed media are considered as they relate to contemporary expression.

ARTS 343 Intermediate Wheel

Prerequisite: ARTS 303. (Both semesters/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

Continued studies in the production of ceramic ware using the potter’s wheel as a primary tool. The course will include an in-depth study of the medium and large bowl forms and lidded forms, the closed form, concentrating on throwing and shaping concepts, rims and necks, trimming and aesthetics, experiences with the pitcher form, the jug and the mug, leather-hard decoration and closed form glazing and firing concepts. Students completing this course will acquire an understanding of the science and technical aspects of and skill in creating wheel- thrown pottery and develop a personal statement with their ceramic art.

ARTS 344 Drawing IV

Prerequisite: ARTS 324 Drawing III or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits) 

An investigation into drawing techniques and impetus as a means of communication and expression. Students accomplished in the fundamentals of perceptual and nonobjective drawing will pursue projects for individual discovery and growth. Focused thematic drawing problems, experimentation with drawing parameters, materials and formats, and the study of contemporary ideologies and current drawing strategies form the core of this course, orienting students to the possibilities of communication specific to the discipline of drawing, and providing a basis for the development of individual drawing projects.

ARTS 345 Ceramic Sculpture

Prerequisite: ARTS 304. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

An in-depth study of materials, skills and procedures relating to a variety of sculpture techniques in clay. Through studio work and correlation of intuitive and intellectual approaches, an emphasis is placed on the understanding and development of aesthetics in the sculptural form. All aspects of slab construction, coil building, modeling and the joining of techniques will be covered with emphasis on form, surface, transitions and terminations. Students will be introduced to sculpting the figure. Considerations for finishing and firing sculptural forms will be covered. Individual sketches and projects, including critiques, will serve to aid in the development of exhibition criteria.

ARTS 469 The Business of Art

 

Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to declared studio arts majors with junior standing or permission of the instructor. (First semester/Lab fee/1 credit) 

The Business of Art will cover the development of concepts in preparation for the artist’s capstone exhibition and explore the business of art which is so critical to the success of an artist’s career. Topics to be covered include writing a resume, artist statement, biographical statement, project plan, budget, PR materials, and exhibition poster, exhibition postcard, press release and photos to be included in a press packet. Each artist will establish a business name and visual identity and learn about taxes and the legal aspects of a career as an artist. Developing a body of work for exhibition, discussion of exhibition concepts, design and aesthetics will emphasize composition and development of artists’ eye and means of documenting inspiration and process. The work will culminate in the preparations of a gallery book/portfolio in preparation for the creation of a body of work for exhibition in ARTS 470 Senior Seminar in Studio Art.

 

ARTS 470 Senior Seminar

Prerequisites: ARTS 469 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee/4 class and studio hours) 

A capstone experience in each student's program of study, the main object of this course is to provide the student with the opportunity to produce a finished portfolio of exhibition quality work. Emphasis is placed on independent production and class presentation. The class will operate as a supportive workshop for ideas, discussions, and critiques of on-going work inclusive of the many studio media. In order to facilitate and inform the on-going discussions of historical, theoretical, critical, and practical problems in the production of artwork, students are expected to read articles from current periodicals, as assigned. Students will also be expected to keep a critical journal consisting of responses to and consideration of student work, critiques, screenings, readings, and discussions. Information on the business aspects relevant to financial survival will also be addressed. Students will be required to exhibit artwork completed in this course in a professional exhibition in the college gallery and participate fully in all aspects of preparation of PR materials, exhibition design, and installation of the exhibition. Students are also required to attend the reception and give a brief gallery talk about their artwork, uninstall and remove their artwork at the close of the exhibition and assist in the return of the gallery to pre-exhibition conditions.

ART 468/568 Contemporary Topics in Visual Art

Prerequisites: Junior standing, completion of 12 credits in ART or ARTS courses with 3 credits at the 300-level or above, cumulative gpa of 2.00 and ART 221. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

This course is designed for more advanced art history and studio art majors and focuses on contemporary topics in the visual arts.  It examines important developments in American and European art and criticism from the 1960s until the present. Topics include Minimalism, Pop, Conceptual Art, Earthworks, the art of institutional critique, performance, Feminism, site-specificity, appropriation and commodity art, activism and Postmodernism.

ART 310 Art History and the Humanities

<p><em>Prerequisite: ART 220 or ART 221 or permission of the instructor. (Both semesters/1 credit)</em></p>

<p>This course will expand upon the themes in Hood's ongoing Humanities Colloquium. Through selected readings and discussion as well as attendance at the Colloquium lectures, students will gain an expanded sense of the central themes of the Humanities and their many connections with art and archaeology.</p>

ART 399C Archaeological Internship & Fieldwork Colloquium

<p><em>Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ART 370 or ART 399 (Both semesters/1 credit)</em></p>

<p>This course is required for students enrolled in an internship or fieldwork experience; it should be taken the same semester as a student enrolls in ART 370 or 399 (or the following fall for those enrolled in ART 370 or 399 during the summer). It complements and supplements the hands-on experiences with a range of relevant readings, research and presentations. Required only the first time a student enrolls in ART 370 or 399.</p>

ART 505 The Youngest Art: The History of Photography (Humanities Elective)

(Course is offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course will consider the origin, development and variety of photography as used throughout the world, from its invention to the present. Students will also become acquainted with contemporary critical and interpretive approaches to photography. Lecture and discussion of selected readings and images. Students will have opportunity to produce both visual and written projects.

AREN 508 Dante and Giotto (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An exploration of the culture of late medieval Florence, addressing such topics as the physical environment of the city, the Florentine historical perspective, spiritual and aesthetic sensibilities. The course will focus on two of the greatest artists of the period: Dante Alighieri and Giotto. (In May, after final exams, students will be offered the opportunity to travel to Italy-—Florence, Siena, Padua and Assisi-—as a group.)

ART 540 Art of Prehistory (Humanities Elective)

(Either semester/3 credits) 

This course traces the development of human culture and civilization, as expressed in artistic and archaeological evidence, from the origins of modern humans through the advent of agriculture and urbanism across the world. It consists of a coherent, chronological survey of human prehistory, as found in the archaeological remains. Special attention will be paid to artistic expression as a medium for communication and change. The geographic areas discussed in this course include southern, western and eastern Asia; Europe; Africa; and the Americas. The broad geographical scope of the course allows us to make comparisons of cultural developments across the globe.

ART 549 Art of Egypt and Mesopotamia (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An examination of the architecture, sculpture, painting and other arts of the major early civilizations of the Near East, from the Neolithic to ca. 500 B.C. The artistic production of these cultures will be considered in its historical and social contexts. Competing theories on such developments as the origins of agriculture and the introduction of writing will be discussed and assessed. Special emphasis on the interconnections between these cultures, as well as their points of divergence.

ART 550 Classical Art and Archaeology (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

This course examines the artistic production and archaeological discovery of the classical age—from the emergence of Greek culture after the Bronze Age to the reign of Constantine (Rome’s first Christian emperor). Both the technological innovations and stylistic developments characteristic of this period will be studied in the major genres of visual representation: painting, sculpture, architecture, mosaic and the decorative arts. Readings and lectures on the history, literature, philosophy and daily life of the Greeks and Romans will supplement the visual material. The placement of these objects and monuments within their cultural context will emphasized, with the ultimate goal being a theoretical understanding of the function(s) of art within classical cultures. Finally, the impact of classical art and culture on later periods of western civilization will be discussed, as well as issues of archaeology and cultural property.

ART 551 Medieval Art (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from the late Roman empire through the Gothic period. Emphasis on the function and meaning of images and their social and ideological contexts in western Europe and Byzantium. Field trips to the Walters Art Gallery, Dumbarton Oaks and the National Cathedral.

ART 552 Northern Renaissance Art (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—as needed/3 credits) 

Painting in Northern Europe from the art of the French courts in the late 13th century through the 16th century in the Netherlands and Germany. Field trips to the Walters Art Gallery and the National Gallery of Art.

ART 553 Early Renaissance Art (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—even years/3 credits) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy, especially Tuscany, from the early 13th century until the late 15th century. Topics include civic, religious and private patronage; the changing status of the artist, and humanism and the arts. Field trips to the Walters Art Gallery and the National Gallery of Art.

ART 555 Art of Asia (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An introduction to the history of art and architecture of the countries of South and East Asia, with an emphasis on India, China, Japan and Korea. Consideration of the major monuments of each culture and their styles, themes and techniques; some discussion of gender,class and ideology in the making and viewing of Asian art.

ART 557 High Renaissance and Mannerist Art (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—as needed/3 credits) 

Through the works of artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and their Venetian counterparts, this course will examine the major developments in Italian art from 1480 until 1580. It will explore a range of artistic and cultural issues, including the notion or artistic genius, the relationship between the study of nature and artistic invention and the changing status of the visual arts. Close attention will also be given to the political and religious contexts.

ART 558 Baroque Art (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—as needed/3 credits) 

European art and architecture of the 17th and 18th centuries. Selected treatment of style, subject matter, medium and context of an art in the age of kings, courts, academies and emergent nations. Slide lectures and discussion, with a field trip to the National Gallery of Art.

ART 560 19th Century Art (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

Art and society in Europe and America during the 19th century. Topics include the development of a “modern” visual idiom, rise in status of the artist, the emergence of museums and galleries, invention and role of photography and new building technologies.

ART 561 20th Century Art (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester/3 credits) 

Art and architecture in our century, up to our own time. Emphasis on the variety of artistic manifestations in recent years (e.g., performance, earthworks, conceptualism, multi-media) and their historical affinities. Also, the course of American art and its rise in influence.

ART 570/470 Seminar: Topics in Art History (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester/3 credits) 

This course will be dedicated to various important subjects in art history and visual culture. Part will be devoted to slide lecture and discussion, part to the presentation and consideration of directed research by students. 

ART 571 Archaeological Fieldwork (Humanities Elective)

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course offers the opportunity to learn archaeological field methods through hands- on experience at an archaeological site selected in collaboration between the student and archaeology concentration coordinator. Students are expected to observe and learn both survey and excavation techniques, as well as participating in recording, drawing and analyzing finds. 

ART 569/469 Advanced Topics in Archaeology

Prerequisite: HUM 501; INST 512 or 3 credits of 500-level ART. (First semester/3 credits) 

This seminar course will be devoted to various important subjects in archaeology. Part will be slide lecture and discussion, including discussions led by students, and part will be presentation and consideration of directed research by students. Topics will be issues of concern to professional archaeologists today; possible topics include archaeological ethics; religion and archaeology; ceramics and archaeology; and science in archaeology.

ART 560 Contemporary Topics in Visual Arts

<p><em>Prerequisites: Six credits in ART or ARTS courses at the graduate level; ART 506 recommended. (Second semester/3credits)</em>&#160;</p>

<p>This course examines important developments in American and European art and criticism from the 1960s until the present. Topics include Minimalism, Pop, Conceptual Art, Earthworks, the art of institutional critique, performance, Feminism, site-specificity, appropriation and commodity art, activism and Postmodernism. </p>

ART 506 Writing for Artists

<p><em>Prerequisite: Enrollment in the graduate program in Ceramic Arts (Second semester/3 credits)</em>&#160;</p>

<p>This course trains students to write about art critically and in a variety of modes. The course will focus on several types of art writing, from analytical reading and writing projects common to graduate courses in Art and Archaeology to artist statements and manifestos, as well as museum catalog entries and exhibition labels. The course involves weekly writing projects designed to expand students’ abilities to observe, describe, research, and analyze artworks, both their own and those produced by others, through writing. </p>

ART 568/468 Contemporary Topics in Visual Art

<p><em>Prerequisite: Prerequisites: Six credits in ART or ARTS courses at the graduate level; ART 506 recommended. (Second semester/3credits)</em>&#160;</p>

<p>This course examines important developments in American and European art and criticism from the 1960s until the present. Topics include Minimalism, Pop, Conceptual Art, Earthworks, the art of institutional critique, performance, Feminism, site-specificity, appropriation and commodity art, activism and Postmodernism.</p>

ARTS 500 Ceramic Handbuilding/Sculpture

(First semester/3 credits/lab fee) 

An in-depth study of materials, skills and procedures relating to a variety of handbuilding techniques in clay. Through studio work and correlation of intuitive and intellectual approaches, an emphasis will be placed on the understanding and development of aesthetics in the ceramic form. Aspects of slab construction, coil building, modeling and joining of techniques will be covered with emphasis on form, surface, transitions and terminations in a sculptural direction. Considerations for finishing and firing handbuilt and sculptural forms will be covered. Individual sketches, projects and critiques will serve to aid in the development of exhibition criteria.

ARTS 501 Glaze Application

(First semester/1 credit/lab fee)  

A study of basic and advanced information and techniques for successful glazing of the ceramic form. A combination of lecture, demonstration and hands-on exercises are designed to build skills, refine techniques, increase efficiency and solve problems in glazing functional and non- functional pottery and ceramic sculpture. Students will learn to analyze the bisque to make appropriate finishing choices that will balance or strengthen the composition, learn techniques that will facilitate the glazing process and discuss procedures to standardize to achieve consistent results.

ARTS 502 East Asian Wedged Coil Techniques

(Summer and first semester/1 credit/lab fee) 

The East Asian Wedged Coil Technique is one of the most valuable methods for the construction of asymmetrical work. A master potters’ tradition, East Asian coil combines coil technique with wheel concepts providing the greatest wet structural strength for clay sculpture. The course will include lecture, demonstration and hands-on exercises to teach advanced coil making and building, as well as advanced techniques of coil riveting, ribbing, bridging, boating and bracing for large and/or sculptural forms in clay.

ARTS 503 Ceramic Wheel: Intensive Throwing

(Both semesters/3 credits/lab fee) 

An advanced study of the production of ceramic ware using the potter’s wheel as a primary tool. Through a progression of experiences, personal research and practice, the student will create open and vertical forms at the potter’s wheel, understand the basic nature of clay, the techniques necessary for throwing and trimming, and produce finished glazed pieces for critique. Students completing this course will acquire a knowledge of advanced methods used to create wheel-thrown pottery, the characteristics of clay, the process of firing and an understanding of ceramic composition.

ARTS 504 Ceramic Decoration

(Summer/3 credits/lab fee)  

A study of a variety of materials and techniques suitable for the enrichment of clay and glaze surfaces, including decoration in the forming process, carved, impressed and added decoration, and various methods of using slips, underglaze and overglaze colors. This course is an in- depth, experiential study of the essential quality and appropriateness to the form and firing process, ceramic technology and three dimensional design concepts that evoke appropriate decorative treatments for works in clay.

ARTS 505 Ceramic Wheel: Masters’ Throwing Concepts

(Summer or winter term/2 credits/lab fee) 

An in-depth study of advanced throwing concepts designed to assist the student to cognitively understand the essence of clay, the broadcast potential of the medium and learn to respond to the movement and the forces affecting the clay during the throwing process in a synthesis of skill, knowledge and artistic expression. Students will build skills, refine technique and increase efficiency in the use of the potter’s wheel, through an exploration of structural strength concepts for wheel-thrown forms, correlation of knowledge of the nature of clay and the forces affecting the movement of the clay on the spinning wheel and exercises designed to train students to feel and direct the movement of the clay in order to increase efficiency.

ARTS 506 Ceramic Wheel: Masters’ Throwing II

Prerequisite: ARTS 503 or 505. (Second semester—odd years/2 credits/lab fee) 

A concentration on advanced throwing skills, to develop the confidence and strength which frees the student to move toward individual aesthetic expression, the course provides a more in-depth coverage of specific concepts with focus on individual needs for building skill, efficiency and personal direction. Students will refine technique and increase efficiency in the use of the potter’s wheel through continued study of methods of building and maintaining structural integrity in the wheel-thrown form, and the acquisition of psychomotor skills through exercises that are not product oriented.

ARTS 507 Plates and Platters

(Second semester—odd years/1 credit/lab fee) 

An in-depth study of the throwing and finishing plates and large platters, including structural strength concepts for low open forms, methods for centering, a variety oinformation on finishing, firing and composition.

ARTS 508 Ceramic Sculpture

Prerequisite: ARTS 502. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee)  

Applied three-dimensional ceramic design and construction covering a variety of methods of hand-forming with clay to take a sculptural direction. Techniques include eastern coil, slab construction, modeling the figure, the portrait bust, structural strength concepts for sculpture and firing considerations for sculptural forms. Individual sketches and projects, including critiques, serve to aid in the development of exhibition criteria with emphasis on technique, finishing and firing choices.

ARTS 509 Throwing Large Forms

Prerequisite: ARTS 505. (Summer/3 credits/lab fee) 

The workshop will focus on the techniques and aesthetic perspective employed to produce large-scale pots. Participants will develop alternate methods to throw and center large pots. Throwing large allows a more elastic understanding of the relationship between object and the space it occupies.

ARTS 510 Brushmaking

(Offered as needed/1 credit/lab fee)  

The brushmaking techniques taught in this course have been adapted from traditional methods used by Japanese potters to take advantage of glues, threads, hair, fibers and other materials that are currently available. While these brushes were originally developed for use in ceramic decoration, they may also be used in a variety of painting applications such as watercolor and tempera.

ARTS 511 Properties of Clay

(First semester/1 credit/lab fee) 

A study of the properties of clay and clay bodies desired by the studio potter. Testing and correction of body formulae for throwing or hand-building clays in stoneware and porcelain. Formulation, testing and correction of slips, terra sigillata and glaze base for specific clay bodies.

ARTS 512 Eastern and Western Techniques in Trimming

Prerequisites: ARTS 503 and ARTS 505. (Winter/1 credit/lab fee) 

In the history of pottery, the importance of the finishing of the thrown work by turning the foot and the trimming of excess clay to refine the form has often been overlooked. The details of trimming enhance or destroy the structural integrity of the form. It is critical for the potter to understand the qualities essential for the structure and aesthetics of the completed piece. The course will cover the basic and advanced information and techniques for successful trimming of the ceramic form. A combination of lecture, demonstration and hands-on exercises will build skills, refine techniques, increase efficiency and solve structural problems. Students will analyze the wet clay form to make appropriate finishing choices that will balanceor strengthen the composition, and learn techniques that will facilitate the trimming process.

ARTS 515 Ceramic Arts Throwing Lab

Prerequisite: ARTS 505 (Either semester/1 credit/lab fee) 

Ceramic Arts Throwing Lab provides students with supervised studio time to develop and refine skills taught in the ceramic arts courses dedicated to throwing on the potter’s wheel. A faculty member will supervise the lab and provide students with information and assistance to work on problem areas. Skills assessments will be conducted at the beginning of the course and the instructor will develop an individual education plan to help the student progress in their throwing skills. Exercises and information will be provided to individuals and small groups with similar problems. Student experiencing difficulties may be required to take the lab and repeat the lab if necessary until their throwing skills have developed sufficiently to enroll in more advanced throwing courses. Students taking ARTS 503, 505, 506, 507, 517, 547 or preparing for 570 may wish to take the lab in order to improve their skills for successful completion of their course or courses.

ARTS 517 Dynamic and Asymmetrical Wheel

Prerequisite: ARTS 505. (First semester—as needed/3 credits/lab fee)  

The course will provide the student with experience in alternatives to simple wheel throwing by combining wheel and handbuilding techniques. Procedures to alter forms include shaping, paddling, faceting, combining separately thrown forms, and integrating coiling and throwing. Work may be in stoneware or porcelain.

ARTS 520 Photographing Ceramics

(Second semester/1 credit/lab fee) 

The study of aesthetic considerations in photographing ceramic art. Composition of the object as it relates to the camera frame. Students will evolve a personal portfolio and slide library of individual works and images.

ARTS 521 Properties of Glaze

Prerequisite: ARTS 501. (First semester/2 credits/lab fee) 

A study of the properties of glazes and the materials used to develop original glazes and adjust existing glazes for stoneware and porcelain. The course will include directed study research and laboratory testing with selected topics in glaze composition, clay/glaze relationship, color, texture and materials.

ARTS 525 Electric Kilns

(Winter term/1 credit/lab fee)  

An in-depth study of all aspects of modern electric kilns used for ceramics, including design, construction and materials, related supplies and equipment, loading procedures, operation, unloading, routine maintenance, diagnosis of common problems and repair, safety and selection criteria for choosing the appropriate kiln for different applications.

ARTS 530 Kiln Technology and Firing Theory

(First semester/2 credits/lab fee) 

A study in kiln stacking and firing procedures with concentration on reduction atmosphere firings; notes on types of kilns and basic kiln construction, oxidation firing, kiln maintenance and repair, kiln furniture, heat measuring devices and safety equipment.

ARTS 531 Wood Firing Theory

(First semester/2 credits/lab fee) 

A study in wood firing with information on loading and stacking procedures, stoking patterns, heat rise and firing theory. Demonstration and understanding of wadding composition and placement, loading, types of woods, stoking patterns; the effects of oxidation/reduction cycles will be covered. Information on types of kilns and basic kiln construction, kiln maintenance, kiln furniture, heat measuring devices and safety issues will also be covered.

ARTS 532 Firing the Large Scale Single or Multi-Chambered Wood Kiln

Prerequisite: ARTS 531. (Second semester or summer term/2 credits/lab fee) 

A study in the history, theory, techniques and aesthetics of the long wood firing in a large single chamber or multi-chambered kiln. These wood fire kilns such as the single chambered Japanese anagama or European tube kilns, or the multi-chambered kiln such as the Chinese dragon kiln, Japanese noborigama or the hybrid kiln which is a combination of a large single chamber and noborigama chambers. In depth information covering all aspects of firing these large historic kilns, including practical experience at each stage of the process. Lectures and demonstrations will include characteristics of work for the wood kiln; decorating with slip and glazing techniques, loading and stacking procedures, wadding composition and placement on pots, tumble stacking and shelf setting, types of woods, the stoking of kiln chambers, analysis of stoking patterns, draft controls, the characteristics and manipulation of combustion cycles and firing theory. Analysis of the firing will occur during the unloading. Information on types of kilns and basic kiln construction, kiln maintenance, kiln furniture, heat measuring devices and safety issues will also be covered.

ARTS 540 Clay and Glaze Chemistry, Theory and Practice

Prerequisites: ARTS 511 and ARTS 521. (Second semester/3 credits/lab fee) 

Directed study research and laboratory testing with selected topics in clay and glaze composition, clay/glaze relationship, color, texture and new materials. A continuing study of clay bodies, the properties desired by the studio potter and testing and correction of body formulas such as stoneware, porcelain, flameware, throwing and handbuilding, plus slips,sigilatta and glaze base.

ARTS 542 Modeling the Figure

Prerequisite: ARTS 508. (Offered as needed/3 credits/lab fee) 

The human figure is ubiquitous in all forms of art. The study of structure, proportion and movement as seen in the human figure is key to the understanding and appreciation of balance, design and the interaction of objects within nature. An in-depth study of the figure in clay, including anatomy and articulation using the life and costumed model. Figurative abstraction, casting the figure and considerations for finishing and firing figurative work will be covered. Individual sketches, projects and critiques will serve to aid in the development of exhibitioncriteria.

ARTS 543 History of Ceramics

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

A study of the history of ceramic arts from its beginning through the present time. Special emphasis is placed on broadening the knowledge and the experience of the student through personal involvement in encountering and researching historic work. The course will examine a number of ceramic traditions, combining the work of the art historian with that of the archeologist. The history of ceramics in the context of the history of the people who made and used the wares. The work from each of the major periods will be discussed. In addition, the ways that these examples were made and their place in the history of ceramic technology will be stressed. Each week during the course of the semester, discussion will focus on a different aspect of ceramic history. Although most of the class period will be devoted to lecture and slides, time will be allowed for class participation.

ARTS 545 Large Scale and Composite Sculpture

Prerequisite: ARTS 508. (First semester—odd years/3 credits/lab fee) 

Directed study in design, construction and finishing of composite and architectural ceramics with emphasis on choice of materials, space and equipment limitations, as well as specific engineering requirements for construction, shrinkage, drying and firing. Topics will include construction and joining methods for thrown, slab, coil, composite, mural and architectural projects.

ARTS 547 Creating with Porcelain

Prerequisite: ARTS 506. (First semester—odd years/3 credits/lab fee) 

An in-depth study of the characteristics and techniques for working with porcelain, including exploration of classical porcelain, low open forms, plates and platters, horizontal throwing and advanced glazing procedures for translucent and opaque porcelain effects.

ARTS 552 Kiln Design and Construction

Prerequisite: ARTS 530. (Summer—even years/3 credits/lab fee) 

Directed study in kiln design and construction, providing an experience in kiln construction.

ARTS 564 Aesthetics and Criticism

(Second semester/3 credits) 

The freedom of personal aesthetic expression is the goal of most artists. Art criticism, spoken or written, conveys a power to build or destroy. The course will explore the languages of aesthetics and criticism to bring the student to the creation and interpretation of beauty and meaning in his artistic statement.

ARTS 570 Seminar in Personal Studio Research

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARTS 569. (Second semester/Lab fee/3 credits) One weekend per month for four months. 

Individual research and personal career development are the focus of the course designed to assist the student in developing a personal artistic statement, setting goals and creating a cohesive body of work. Through a study of gallery installation, studio organization and marketing, students will prepare for and present a professional exhibition of their work. Class time will be devoted to presentation of work and group critique, individual problem solving, aesthetic discussions and information about professional development, studio organizatiogallery installation, marketing, legal and ethical issues.

ARTS 571 Arts Management and Marketing

Prerequisite: ARTS 570. (First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

In our society, an artist functions as sole proprietor of a small business which markets personal art work. Financial survival for the artist depends on the ability to manage the business and market the art work. The course will provide an artist with the management and marketing skills essential to start and operate the business.

ARTS 576 Thesis Preparation

Prerequisites: ARTS 570 and 48 required MFA course credits. (3 credits/lab fee) 

The master’s thesis should exhibit qualities that are associated with original research: scholarship, logical consistency, creativity, and comprehensiveness. Candidates will develop an understanding of the meaning of original research. Thesis preparation will facilitate organization of time, approach and topic of the Masters of Fine Art Thesis at Hood College. The procedures in planning, writing the abstract and conceptual format of the thesis, selection of the active thesis committee, and presentation of the thesis are included. The proposal must contain a clear definition of the problem, a justification of the research, a review of previous research, proposed methods of investigation, a tentative research bibliography and images of work, either slides or digital format. The Hood College MFA Guidelines contain detailed information for the preparation of the thesis proposal. The student is required to meet all requirements stated in the Hood College MFA Guidelines.

ARTS 580 M.F.A. Thesis Research

Prerequisite: ARTS 576. (6 credits/lab fee) 

Thesis Research provides the opportunity to proceed with in-depth research in the candidate’s chosen area. The candidate is expected to produce a significant body of work and supporting documentation of the aesthetic and technical research as evidence of his or her growing ability to develop and continue an aesthetic and technical dialogue. The master’s thesis must exhibit qualities that are associated with original research: scholarship, logical consistency, creativity, and comprehensiveness. MFA candidates are required to submit the final draft of their written thesis at the completion of ARTS 580 before concurrent registration for ARTS 595 begins. The MFA candidate must consult the Hood College MFA Thesis Guidelines for detailed information and expectations and satisfy all requirements found in the guidelines.

ARTS 595 M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in ARTS 580. (4 credits/lab fee) 

Thesis Exhibition is the implementation of the results of the thesis research culminating in a body of work presented in a public exhibition. The MFA Thesis in Ceramic Arts requires a public exhibition of work based on the results of the thesis research. All planning, preparation and implementation of the thesis exhibition will be the responsibility of the MFA candidate.

ARTS 599 Special Topics in Ceramics Arts

(1-3 credits/lab fee) 

Selected topics courses, 1-3 credits, offer an opportunity for students to study specific ceramic art topics not included in the regular course offerings. Usually taught by guest artists, the selected topics courses provide a variety of directions and voices beyond the basic curriculum.

ARTS 569 Survival Skills for Visual Artists

Prerequisite: Completion of twelve credits in the graduate certificate program or MFA. (First semester/Lab fee/1 credit)

Survival Skills for Visual Artists covers the development of concepts in preparation for the artist’s capstone exhibition and explores the business of art which is so critical to the success of an artist’s career. The course addresses the multitude of practical concerns and multifaceted skills needed to survive in the world of art. Creating artwork and developing a body of work for exhibition are just the beginning. An artist must deal with the practical matters of survival: production plans, taxes, record keeping, contracts, documenting art work, copyrights, web pages, business cards, posters, postcards and other PR concerns, as well as writing about art, resumes, artist statements, biographical statements, press releases, ad copy, and writing about art for publication in journals and newspapers and other venues involved in getting the word out about your art. Developing a body of work for exhibition, the discussion of exhibition concepts and emphasis on design and aesthetics will facilitate the development of the artist’s eye and provide the means to document inspiration process and the work itself. Researching and writing an article for submission to an appropriate journal and the compilation of a gallery book/portfolio will prepare students for the creation of a body of work for exhibition in ARTS 570 Seminar in Personal Studio Research.

ARTS 574 Advanced Studies in Ceramic Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 530, ARTS 540 and/or permission of the instructor. (First semester—even years/3 credits/lab fee) 

This course will provide the student who already has advanced knowledge with the opportunity to learn how to perform solid research and put their knowledge into practice. The specific ceramic arts research topic will be selected by the instructor in collaboration with the student, in order to provide experience in an area that has not been emphasized in the student’s previous studies and to provide creative balance in their overall education in the ceramic arts. The topic will be chosen from three categories, sculpture and hand-building, wheel work, or technical problems. The research, consisting of both literature search and instructed experimentation, and terminating in a written report, will be completed by the student with the instructor’s direction throughout this course. The student will gain an understanding of critical thinking and the nature of research before progressing to more advanced thesis levels of study or employment.