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Courses Offered

CMA 200 Mass Media and Society (CORE—Social and Behavioral Analysis)

(Either semester/3 credits) 

Development of newspapers, magazines, radio, film and television, with emphasis on the impact of mass communication on reader, viewer and listener.

 

CMA 201 News Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. May not be taken on an audit basis. Credit by exam.(Both semesters/3 credits) 

An introduction to writing for various publics using a variety of formats within the contexts of informing, persuading and entertaining. Applications will include print news media, broadcast news media and public relations.

 

 

 

CMA 204 Media History

(First semester/3 credits) 

The history and development of mass communications in the United States, from colonial newspapers and pamphlets to recent innovations in satellite and fiber optics transmissions, with attention to the significance and effect of the media on American culture.

 

CMA 207 Principles of Speech Communication

Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

An analysis and application of theories and techniques to communicate effectively with another person, and with small, large and massive groups in a variety of situations.

 

CMA 208 Editing and Layout

Prerequisite: CMA 201 or permission of the instructor. May not be taken on an audit basis. Credit by exam. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

Evaluation and preparation of copy, pictures and other graphic materials for publication; page layouts; newspaper makeup. Some attention to newsletters and house organs.

 

CAIT 221 Applied Computer Graphics

Prerequisite: IT 180 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/3 credits) 

A study of computer graphics from an applied point of view. The course will consider concepts and techniques underlying the creation and use of graphics, including computer drawing, CAD presentation, image editing, bit-mapped and vector graphics, image compression, algorithms for line and curve mapping and image manipulation. Students will also get hands- on experience in using various kinds of graphics software.

 

CMA 226 Visual Media Production

(Both semesters/lab fee/3 credits)

Introduction to video production, including script writing, camera work, editing and sound in both field and studio situations. Includes survey of commercial and noncommercial video applications. Video screenings, written and visual projects required.

 

CMA 242 Persuasion

Prerequisites: Sophomore, junior or senior standing and CMA 207 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/3 credits) 

A study of the persuasive processes that change people’s lives and the values of society. Special attention to application in the electronic media.

 

CMA 246 Graphics

(Both semesters/3 credits) 

This course is planned to provide a working knowledge of basic skills required in the graphics field including layout, design and desktop publishing. Studio problems and lectures provide diversified experiences upon which future specialization can be developed. Extensive computer use. No computer experience necessary.

 

CMA 260 Feature Writing

Prerequisite: CMA 201 or permission of the instructor. May not be taken on an audit basis. Credit by exam. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

A study of the basic types of feature articles; emphasis on practice in research and writing.

 

CMA 280 Screen Craft (CORE—Art, Music, Film or Other Media)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent. (Second semester/3 credits) 

Students will acquire the tools to analyze the form and content of American contemporary and classic motion pictures through an examination of the film industry, the elements of cinematography and screen writing and the criteria for critical review.

 

CMA 281 Introduction to Screen Writing

Prerequisite: CMA 280 or ART 275 (Second semester/3 credits) 

Introduction to Screen Writing is designed to acquaint students with the process of writing fiction narrative film. The class will concentrate on story structure, scene construction, character development and dialogue.

 

CMA 299 Special Topics in Communication Arts

(First semester/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

An opportunity for groups of eight or more students to study topics suggested by their special interests and those of the staff and not included in the regular offerings. Topics will vary. Offered at the discretion of the English department.

 

CMA 303 Advanced Reporting

Prerequisite: CMA 201 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits) 

Advanced exercises in the gathering and writing of news with emphasis on more complex forms of reporting and writing, including interpretive and investigative work. Off-campus reporting assignments will be encouraged.

 

CMA 304 Online Journalism

Prerequisites: CMA 201, CMA 208 or CMA 246 and junior or senior status. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

This course will cover the principles and practices of online journalism, including writing and editing for online media; blogging and other forms of user-generated content; gathering and editing images, audio and video for online use; and legal and ethical issues facing online journalists.

 

CMA 305 Communications Law

Prerequisite: CMA 201 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits) 

A survey of the evolution of the laws of mass communications, with particular emphasis on the First Amendment, applications of the laws of libel and privacy, the federal Freedom of Information Act and sunshine and shield statutes.

 

CMA 306 Writing for Business and Management

Prerequisites: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. Junior or senior standing. May not be taken on an audit basis. (Both semesters/3 credits)

Development of skills in writing letters, memos and reports.

 

CMA 310 Public Relations

Prerequisite: CMA 201 or CMA 306 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/ 3 credits)

The history, theory and practice of public relations in corporate, institutional and government settings.

 

CMA 312 Introduction to Communication Research

Prerequisite: Completion of the Computational area of the Core. Completion of one or more of the following is recommended, but not required: CMA 200, CMA 310, MGMT 301 or MGMT 306. (First semester/3 credits) 

This course will examine the basic components of communication research including logic, theories and ethics. Topics covered include the different approaches to communication research, the essential elements of both qualitative and quantitative research, analysis and interpretation of data, and resources available.

 

CMA 313 Writing for Public Relations

Prerequisites: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139, CMA 201 and 310. (Second semester/3 credits) 

This course will prepare students to become effective and persuasive public relations communicators in both written and oral methods. Additionally, this course will prepare students to decisively communicate complex information into simple and clear prose that has meaning for their respective publics. By using both lecture and practical exercises, the student will be able to effectively use 13 persuasive communication tools. The final project is a comprehensive writing portfolio of all assignments.

 

CMA 320 Broadcast Writing and Reporting

Prerequisite: CMA 201. (First semester/3 credits) 

This course is designed to teach students the techniques of writing, reporting and editing for the broadcast media. Topics to be covered include interviewing for broadcast, selecting and matching video and soundbites and the use and potential misuse of video and sound.

 

CMA 350 Television in America (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and completion of the Social and Behavioral Analysis area of the Core. (Either semester/3 credits) 

An examination of the cultural, political and sociological effects of television on America. The course will offer a brief history of the development of television, and then examine such issues as television and violence; television and children; television and politics; and television and society.

 

CMA 370 Practicum

Prerequisites: 6 credits (exclusive of CMA 200 and 207) in communications courses, and permission of the director. May be repeated. (Either semester/2 or 3 credits) 

Opportunity for on-the-job training and experience in an institutional situation emphasizing communications skills.

 

CMA 375 Independent Study

Prerequisites: 12 credits in communication arts at the 200 level or above and permission of the instructor and the director. May be repeated once. (Either semester/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

An opportunity for students to explore topics in communications not covered by coursework or to conduct projects involving communications skills.

 

CMA 399 Internship in Communications

Prerequisites: Open to majors and other qualified students who have completed with distinction most or all of the communication arts requirements. Permission of the department required. (Either semester or 14-week summer period/6 to 15 credits) 

Practical experience in the application of communication concepts and the utilization of communication skills in settings such as business, industry and the mass media. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

CMA 411 Public Relations Campaigns

Prerequisites: CMA 310, 312 and 313. (Second semester/3 credits) 

This is an advanced course in public relations. The focus of this course is on the process of public relations and includes all key elements of the process: research, planning, implementation, evaluation. Learning will be achieved through application of the process to a real organization’s legitimate problem/opportunity.

 

CMA 470 Seminar in Media Issues

Prerequisite: Open to communication arts majors with junior or senior standing or by permission of the instructor. (First semester/3 credits) 

An examination and critical analysis of major, continuing issues in communications and the mass media through classroom discussions, readings and independent research.

 

CMA 282 History of American Film (CORE—Art, Music, Film or Other Media)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139.(First semester/3 credits) 

A survey of American narrative film from the great silents through the 3D blockbusters of today. Emphasis will be placed on every major period of American narrative film history through the 20th Century, in relation to the cultural and political history of the times in which they were made.

 

CMA 302 Visual Media Production II

Prerequisite: CMA 226 or permission of the instructor (Second semester/lab fee/3 credits) 

This course will allow students to advance their visual media production skills and knowledge while creating enhanced digital video content. Students will learn the process of producing standard industry, scripted and unscripted video packages such as interviews, presentations and live event coverage. Students will learn advanced video production skills within the realities of professional expectations, deadlines and collaboration. In addition, students will learn and implement pre-production, production and post-production processes, using professional level software and applications.

 

CMA 336 Graphic Design II

Prerequisite: CMA 246 or permission of the instructor. CAIT 221 does not fulfill this prerequisite. (First semester/lab fee/3 credits) This course expands on the fundamentals of design, visual communication and conceptualization introduced in CMA 246 Graphic Design I. Students demonstrate skills at a higher level of performance. In addition to typography, color and composition, students are engaged in problem-solving and critical thinking activities in order to solve fundamental design problems. Students apply learned skills to the completion of more complex projects.

CMA 337 Graphic Design III

Prerequisite: CMA 336 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/lab fee/3 credits) 

This course expands on the fundamentals of design, visual communication and conceptualization introduced in Graphic Design I and Graphic Design II. A series of advanced projects will create a portfolio of work, including a special project with real clients(s). Emphasis will be on showcasing a unique style and demonstration of conceptual abilities. Students are encouraged to have control over their projects: performing their own research, authoring their own writing and editing, and creating their own imagery. This course will focus on creating finished professional-quality work.

 

CMA 402 Visual Media Production III

Prerequisite: CMA 302 and CMA 320 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—even years/3 credits) 

This course will allow students to further refine their visual media production skills and knowledge while creating near-professional quality digital video content for public distribution. Students will collaborate in teams to produce and distribute on-going visual media content relevant to the Hood College community. In the process, students will build a portfolio of material useful in seeking an entry-level position in the communications field.

 

CMA 209 Mass Media and Revolution (CORE—Social and Behavioral Analysis)

(First semester—even years/3 credits) 

Students will explore how the mass media foster, influence and are shaped by political and social revolutions. Students will consider how predominant press theories explain the media's role in revolutions from the American Revolution through current uprisings in the Middle East, including the American civil rights movement and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Students will consider how the mass media interact with power structures within society and how various members of society use the media to communicate ideas and instigate change.

 

CMA 307 Reel Journalism

Prerequisite: CMA 280 or permission of the instructor (First semester—odd years/3 credits)  Reel Journalism explores the portrayal of reporters, editors, photojournalists and broadcasters at work in feature narrative films made in the US from the 1930s to the present. The course will examine the social and political contexts of over 35 movies, and will be divided into four parts as follows: the journalist as hero; the journalist as villain; the journalist as participant, and the journalist as witness.

THEA 101 The Elements of Acting

(Either semester/4 credits)

This course introduces students to the actor’s art and techniques. Students will learn and use exercises, discussion, rehearsal and performance to broaden their experience of theater and themselves. They will also sample a spectrum of theatrical methodologies and reflect on their own learning process in order to develop their own voice as a theater artist. There are no prerequisites for this course.

THEA 210 Acting II

Prerequisites: THEA 101 and permission of instructor. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

This course will examine acting practices and performance principles associated with scene study and performance of published realistic plays. Characterization techniques and script analysis for actors will be covered in depth. Reading, journaling, in-class exercises and out-of-classroom rehearsals will be integral parts of this course. This course will culminate in a public performance of work.

THEA 370 Theater Practicum

Prerequisites: Declared theater and drama minor and permission of program director. (Second semester/1 credit) 

For participation in the theater program’s curricular productions, credit can be earned in the following areas: acting, stage management, design/technical production. An audition or interview may be required and prior approval of the Hood College Theatre director is always required. Smaller roles or responsibilities may not qualify for credit. Declared theater minors can register for one credit hour of THEA 370 per semester, up to three times. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

ENTH 303 Elements of Playwriting

Prerequisites: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139 and ENGL 219. May not be taken on an audit basis. (Spring semester—even years/4 credits)

This workshop-based course is an immersion in the creative process of the playwright. Each student-playwright will begin to understand how to move from initial conception to the execution of a sketch, scene, one-act or full-length play for the stage. Each student-playwright will be introduced to the fundamentals of writing for the stage and will complete a first draft of either a one-act or a full-length play.

ENTH 229 History of Drama and Theatre I (CORE—Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (First semester/4 credits)

This course will examine the history, development, themes, characters, literary devices, and production values of a variety of theatre and drama, including Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, Renaissance Italy, Elizabethan England, Asia, 17th c. France, 18th c. England, and 18th and 19th c. America. Playwrights studied will include Sophocles, Aristophanes, liturgical dramatists, commedia performers, Shakespeare, Jonson, Chikamatsu, Molière, Sheridan, Tyler and Daly. (H1, G)

ENTH 230 History of Drama and Theatre II (CORE—Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (Second semester/3 credits) 

This course will examine the history, development, themes, characters, literary devices, and production values of a variety of theatre and drama, including 19th c. Realism, Naturalism, Modernism and Postmodernism. Playwrights studied will include Ibsen, Wilde, Chekhov, O'Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, Beckett, Pinter, Shepard, Mamet, Wilson and Kushner.

THEA 102 Improvisation

 

Prerequisite: THEA 101 or permission of the instructor (Second semester—odd years/4 credits)

This class is an introduction to long-form improvisation and "Harold" as developed by Del Close at Second City and iO in Chicago and UCB in New York. The student-improviser will be introduced to the fundamentals of improvisation: listening, trust, agreement and commitment; and come to understand callbacks, tag-outs, finding the game in a scene, "yes-and", swinging doors, edits, and montage; and each student will perform many Harolds for classmates and outside audiences.

 

THEA 202 The Theatre and Films of Buster Keaton (CORE-Aesthetic Appreciation/Art,Music,Film)

<p><em>Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Composition requirement of the Core. (Second semester— odd years/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>This class is an immersion in both the theatre and cinema of the great comedic actor, director and writer Joseph Frank “Buster” Keaton.  The student will come to understand Buster’s personal and artistic evolution from his early theatre days as a part of his family’s vaudeville act to his early silent films with Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle and on through his masterpiece of silent cinema The General (1926) and beyond.  </p>

THEA 254 Directing

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor (Offered as needed/4 credits)

This class is an introduction to the artistic process of the director focusing on the fundamentals of directing plays for live theatre. We will touch on all aspects of the director's process from initial conception through the rehearsal process to performance.

THEA 255 Auditioning

Prerequisite: THEA 101 or permission of the instructor. (Offered as needed/4 credits)

In this course, the advanced theatre student will focus on the process of auditioning for theatre. Each student will develop six new audition pieces. We will also discuss the ins and outs of the audition process as well as the business side of acting involving headshots, professionalism and agents.

ENGL 099 Basic Writing Skills

Prerequisite: Level I placement on the Basic Writing Skills Inventory test. (Both semesters/2 credits) 

Study and practice of mechanics, grammar, sentence structure and paragraph orientation. Offered through The Josephine Steiner Center for Academic Achievement and Retention with cooperation of the English department. Grading is S/U. Students who complete ENGL 099 successfully should register for ENGL 100 in the following semester.

 

ENGL 100 Elements of Composition (CORE—Foundation/Writing)

Prerequisites: Permission of the department and placement on Basic Skills Inventory test. May not be audited. (Both semesters/4 credits) 

This intensive course in expository writing emphasizes the fundamentals of grammar, sentence structure and paragraph construction. Learning involves three methods of instruction: classroom discussion, a writing laboratory and tutorial conferences.

 

ENGL 101 The Writing Process (CORE—Foundation/Writing)

Prerequisite: Placement on the Basic Skills Inventory test. Open to freshmen and sophomores. Credit by exam. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

An expository writing course that emphasizes frequent writing and rewriting. Students have individual conferences with their instructors to plan or critique essays. May not be audited or taken without satisfactory performance on the Basic Writing Skills Inventory.

 

ENGL 110-139 Writing about Literature (CORE—Foundation/Writing)

Prerequisite: Placement on the Basic Skills Inventory test. Open to freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated once with a different topic with permission of the English Department Chair. Credit by exam. (Both semesters/3 credits).

An expository writing course that emphasizes reading to become a better writer. Classes will focus on close reading, and students will respond to the texts in short analytical essays. Various topics offered each semester. May not be audited or taken without satisfactory performance on the Basic Writing Skills Inventory.

The following topics have been offered recently:

  • ENGL 113 Children's Literature 
    A college education begins in children's literature. This statement will be explored by looking closely at popular children's literature, its authors and its illustrators.

  • ENGL 114 Medieval Texts, Modern Expressions
    This course will focus on how (and why) modern day literature recycles literature from the medieval period. Though some medieval literature will be read, the class will focus primarily on modern retellings of medieval myths and tales. Texts may include The Lord of the RingsBeowulfThe Mists of Avalon and the romances of King Arthur.

  • ENGL 128 Gothic Tradition
    An expository writing course that also explores the psychological and moral horror of the Gothic novel. Course wil consist of class discussion of assigned reading, lecture on the six central modes of discourse, and writing. Texts include Wuthering HeightsThe Castle of Otranto, ChristabelJamaica Inn, and Frankenstein.

  • ENGL 131 In Search of Identity: The Cultural Construction of Self in Literature
    A look at the way individuals of various social and ethnic backgrounds forge an identity within the context of primarily Eurocentric American culture, to understand how culture both shapes and reflects our identity. Authors may include Amy Tan, Michael Dorris, Bebe Campbell, Ernest J. Gaines, Sandra Cisneros and John Irving.

  • ENGL 136 Humans with Insides: Some Literary Believers
    “What is our human worth? Are we moral subjects to be respected, or subjects fit for manipulation? How do various writers view this bedrock ethical issue? This course will have a look. Works will include Hemingway’s Hills Like White Elephants, Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily, O’Connor’s Guest of the Nation and Erdich’s The Red Convertible.

  • ENGL 138 Literary Encounters with the Real World  
    Many British and American writers have dramatized the crucial and sometimes harrowing passage into adulthood. We'll consider how some of them have viewed this transition. Hawthorne, Frank O'Connor, Faulkner, and Louise Erdrich will be among them.

   

     

ENGL 210 Approaches to Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139; by invitation of the department. (Second semester/4 credits)

This course is an introduction to literature for students considering an English major. We discuss and evaluate the many different ways of approaching a work of literature. Each member of the English faculty presents a work of literature and leads a discussion in the light of a critical vantage point. We read a wide variety of poetry, drama and narrative prose; and our perspectives may include feminist, psychological, mythopoeic and new historicist analysis, among others.

 

ENGL 219 Creative Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. May not be taken on an audit basis. (Both semesters/4 credits)

An introduction to various forms of creative writing, this is an intensive writers’ workshop requiring active participation from all members. Individual conferences in addition to class meetings. May not be audited.

 

 

ENGL 221 World Literature (CORE—Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (First semester/4 credits)

A study of world literature in translation particularly relevant to our own cultural heritage. Readings are drawn from the antique, classical, medieval and early modern periods, and typically include Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Ariosto and Cervantes. (H1, CT)

 

ENGL 222 British Literature Through the 18th Century

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (First semester/4 credits)

Selected readings from the medieval period to the beginning of cultural divergence between England and America. Readings from Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, Defoe and others. (H1)

 

ENGL 223 American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (Second semester/ 4 credits)  

An introduction to the American imagination as expressed in fiction, poetry, essays, autobiography and nature writing. May include works by Wheatley, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Twain, Wharton, Faulkner, Hurston, Hughes, Updike, Momaday and Brooks. (H2)

 

ENGL 250-269 Thematic Studies (CORE—Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/ Literature)

 

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. May be repeated with a different topic. (4 credits)

A study of a significant theme or subject in selected works of literature. May be repeated with different topic.

Topics for 2013-2014

  • ENGL 250 Avatars of the Past: Narratives of Rome and Britain
    This course considers two types of narrative writing: history and fiction. We will explore how these two terms are defined, where they overlap, and where they (should) diverge. The focus will be on the cultures of ancient Rome and late medieval/early modern England, as well as three figures that have come to represent these societies in the modern imagination: Julius Caesar, King Richard III, and Queen Elizabeth I. (H1)
  • ENGL 252 The Modern Wasteland: Death and Rebirth in 20th Century English Literature
    A study of major works of modern English literature with an emphasis on the social, psychological and religious implications of the notion that modern life is a spiritual wasteland, a dead land calling out for rebirth. Texts may include works by Conrad, Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Forster and Auden. (H2)

  • ENGL 253 Revolting Peasants and Red-Hot Heretics: Medieval Literature of Power and Dissent
    A study of who had power in Medieval England, and how those on top stayed that way. This course will explore the ways in which medieval literature reflects the nature of power in medieval society, and also how literature itself was used to reinforce or to challenge the authority of the nobility and the Church. Sample areas of literary study: the disruptive power of women mystics, challenges to the Church and the persecution of heretics and non- Christians, accounts of the Peasant’s Revolt of 1381 and the decline of chivalry and nobility. Texts will include works of major figures such as King Alfred, AElfric, Wulfstan, Chaucer, Wycliffe, Langland, Margery Kempe and Christine de Pizan, as well as a host of lesser- known writers. (H1, CT)

  • ENGL 257 The Romantic Impulse
    Romantic motifs in English literature of the nineteenth century. Readings will include both novels and poems. Texts may be selected from works by Scott, Bronte, Blake, Byron, and Wordsworth. (H2)

  • ENGL 258 The Victorian Mind
    A study of major themes in Victorian literature with emphasis on the impact of the industrial and scientific revolutions on society, religion and art. Texts may include novels by Dickens or Eliot, essays by Mill, Carlyle and Arnold, and poems by Tennyson, Browning and Arnold. (H2)

    ENGL 259 Medieval Magic and Mysticism

    In this course, we will explore the ways in which magic and mysticism were woven into the fabric of medieval society. We will consider the categories of magic, religion and science, and attempt to discover where they intersect and where they diverge. We will also reflect upon how medieval understandings of gender were integrated into these concepts. Finally, we will look at how medieval articulations of magic survive and continue to influence the popular culture of today. No previous experience reading early literature is required; however, this is a reading-intensive course, with texts in Middle English and Early Modern English as well as in translation. (H1)

  • ENGL 261 American Transcendentalism and Dark Romanticism
    A study of the major authors and themes of the American Transcendental and Anti-Transcendental or Dark Romantic movements. Texts will include essays by Emerson and Thoreau, novels and short stories by Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe, and poems by Whitman and Dickinson. (H2)

  • ENGL 262 Writing on Art
    A study of ekphrastic writing, or literature on, about, or inspired by works of art. The course will be geared toward an interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between literature and the visual arts. Texts will include a range of classical to contemporary works by authors such as Homer, Keats, Wilde, Woolf, Auden, and Ashbery. (H2, CT)

  • AFEN 265 African-American Voices Before the 20th Century
    A study of how early African-American literary traditions have been formed not only by slavery, but also by community, geography, orality, politics and literature itself. Works may include slave narratives of Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, as well as 19th century fiction by Harriet Wilson, Frances Harper, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Charles Chesnutt. (H2)

  • AFEN 266 The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond: 20th-Century African-American Literature
    Beginning with the energetic era of the Harlem renaissance, this course studies African- American writings in the 20th century. Themes discussed include the influence of folk elements and music, the appearance of the trickster and masking techniques as both a means of survival and art forms, the issue of audience address and language choices and the subject of dual consciousness. May include works by DuBois, Johnson, Toomer, Larsen, Hurston, G. Jones, Baldwin, Walker, C. Johnson and Morrison. (H2)

  • ENPL 267 Vice and Virtue
    Through analysis and discussion of selected works of great literature, students will examine themes of vice and virtue in four broad areas: (1) selfhood, community, and alienation; (2) human nature; (3) the quest for meaning and human fulfillment; and (4) ethics and evil. This course will consider such topics as the following: the relation between the individual and the community, the nature of evil, ends and means, personal agency, the good life, and moral conflict. May include works by William Golding, Leo Tolstoy, Dorothy L. Sayers, John Updike, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Albert Camus. (H2, CT)

    ENGL 269 Arthur: The Once and Future King
    This course will focus on the legend of King Arthur, the mythical King of the Britons who (it is said) will return to help his people in their hour of need. From the earliest mentions of Arthur in the chronicles and myths of post-Roman Britain through the films, novels, and television of today, we will explore key points in the development of the Arthurian legend. Readings may include texts by Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chretien de Troyes, Sir Thomas Malory, Alfred Lord Tennyson, T.H. White, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and others. We will discover how these stories helped to define what it meant to be "British" as Arthur's realm developed from a conquered and invaded island to the powerful Victorian Empire on which the sun was said never to set-and also think about how this narrative has translated to those of us living "across the pond." (CT)

 

 

ENGL 270-289 Genre Studies (CORE—Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. May be repeated with a different topic. (4 credits)

A study of a particular genre, such as the novel, the short story, poetry, drama or autobiography.

Topics for 2013-2014  

  • ENGL 272 The Short Story
    Students will read, discuss and write about a wide-ranging selection of short stories, studying authorial and historical technique, point of view, voice, structure and subject matter. (H2, G)

  • ENGL 275 The American Novel
    An introduction to the development of the American novel from the late 18th century through the 20th century. May include works by Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Harriet Wilson, James, Chopin, Cather and Plath. (H2, G)

  • ENGL 278 The Woman in the Poem
    A study of 20th century American poetry by and about women. The class will emphasize close analysis of particular texts by poets such as Denise Levertov, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. (H2, G)

  • ENGL 280 20th Century Ethnic Narratives: Writing Ourselves into America
    In this course, we will explore how national and personal histories of ethnicity in the United States are handed down, revised and contradicted in both autobiography and fiction. Along the way, we will also pay attention to themes of family, work and growing up, as well as definitions of community and individuality, asking how someone’s ethnicity might inform his or her world view. Readings may include fiction by Paule Marshall, John Edgar Wideman, John Okada, Julia Alvarez, Sherman Alexie and Cynthia Ozick. (H2, G)

  • ENGL 282 Forms in Poetry
    A study of the forms and techniques of poetry, including both critical analysis and creative practice. We will read and analyze a variety of poetic forms, including sonnets, sestinas, ballads, villanelles, prose poems, and pantoums, by modern and contemporary poets. In addition to close readings of poems, students will write original poems in various forms. (G)

  • ENGL 283 Modern American Poetry
    A study of the richly various poetry produced in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century. The course will focus on modern American poets such as Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, and Elizabeth Bishop.  (H2, G)

  • ENGL 284 The Medieval Romance: Audacious Knights, Daring Deeds and “Virtuous” Maidens
    We will explore the development of the romance as a literary genre. Included in our investigation are societal influences on the texts and literary influences on society: how did authors use the genre to depict idealistic love and, likewise, to interrogate society’s emphasis on courtly love as the perfect form? The texts that we will examine include (but are not limited to) Gawain and the Green Knight, the Lais of Marie de France, selections from Chaucer’s works such as The Canterbury Tales and The Book of the Duchess and Mallory's Le Morte de Arthur. (H1, CT)

  • ENGL 285 The British Novel
    This course will explore the British novel as a site of ongoing experimentation and development. We will move from the genre’s 18th century hybrid origins, to the romance and realist traditions of the 19th century, and into the modernist and postmodernist movements of the 20th and 21st centuries. Consideration of formal features and traditions will unfold in the company of historicized discussions about identity formation and representations of gender, class, race and nation. We will ask how novels as material constructs come to “matter” in the socio-political circumstances in which they arise, and why novels—old and new—continue to matter today. Authors may include Defoe, Sterne, Austen, Dickens, Hardy, Woolf and Ishiguro. (H2, G)

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ENGL 299 Special Topics

Offered at the discretion of the department. (Either semester/1-4 credits)

An opportunity for groups of eight or more students to study topics suggested by their special interests and those of the faculty and not included in the regular offerings.

 

ENGL 400 Really Old English: Anglo-Saxon Language, Literature and Culture (CORE— Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of at least 12 credits in literature. (Second semester—odd years/ 4 credits)

An introduction to the earliest forms of English language and literature. This course will cover the basic elements of Old English (the oldest form of the language we speak today), and teach students how to read and translate Old English prose and poetry. The course will also explore a range of Anglo-Saxon literature, some in the original language, and some in translation, with an eye to understanding the culture and history of the Anglo-Saxon world. (H1)

ENGL 313 Shakespeare

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 210, ENGL 222 or ENGL 223; or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the dramatic works of Shakespeare. Although some attention is devoted to the historical moment in which he produced his plays, the primary focus is on Shakespeare’s language and theatre. Filmed versions of the plays will be used to supplement textual analysis. (WS)

 

ENGL 318 Chaucer

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 210, ENGL 222, or ENGL 223; or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

A study of the selected works of the medieval poet who helped start the tradition of writing poetry and prose in English. The class will focus primarily on The Canterbury Tales; it will also introduce students to Middle English, so that the poetry may be appreciated in Chaucer’s own language. Special attention will be given to the history and culture of England during Chaucer’s lifetime. (WS)

 

ENGL 330 Modern Women Playwrights

 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 210, ENGL 222 or ENGL 223; or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—odd years/ 4 credits)

The course explores the major themes, dramatic structures and theatrical techniques that characterize plays written by women in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will examine the ways in which selected playwrights explore the experience of women, including concerns about sexual freedom and economic independence. (H2, G)

 

 

ENGL 335 Teaching Assistantship in English

Prerequisite: Permission of the department. May be repeated once.(Either semester/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

The assistantship offers students the opportunity to refine their editing and leadership skills as they work with students in the The Josephine Steiner Center for Academic Achievement and Retention. Under the supervision of Center for Academic Achievement and Retention staff, assistants serve as teaching and tutorial aides to students seeking to improve their basic writing skills. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

ENGL 340-359 Writers of Significance

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 210, ENGL 222 or ENGL 223; or permission of the instructor. May be repeated with different writers. (4 credits)

A study of one or more significant writers or a distinct school of writers.

The following topics have been offered recently:

  • ENGL 342 Jane Austen
    A close analysis of the art of Jane Austen, emphasizing the resources of her language and her powers of social perception. Reading will include Austen's six completed novels: Sense and SensibilityPride and PrejudiceMansfield ParkEmmaNorthanger Abbey, and Persuasion. (WS)

  • ENGL 344 Woolf and Forster
    An analysis of the lives, art, and ideas of E. M. Forster and Virginia Woolf. Texts may include Forster's A Room with a ViewHoward's End, and A Passage to India, and Woolf's Mrs. DallowayTo the Lighthouse, and The Waves. (WS)

  • ENGL 346 Erdrich, Silko, Alexie  
    A study of three of America's most influential contemporary Native American writers. The class will explore these authors' historic and cultural contexts to some degree. Readings may include 
    Silko's Ceremony and Storyteller, Erdrich's Antelope Wife and Plague of Doves, and Alexie's Indian Killer and Flight. (WS)

  • ENGL 347 Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson  
    This course is an in-depth study of the two most important poets of nineteenth-century America, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. In addition to a close examination of Whitman's antebellum poetry and Civil War work and Dickinson's manuscript fascicles and letters, the course will use recent criticism and biographical sources to help illuminate the works in question. (WS)

 

ENGL 365 The Renaissance Amphibium (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 210, ENGL 222 or ENGL 223; or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/ 4 credits)  

As they move between two worlds—the infinite possibilities of spirit and the nightmarish limits of the physical—writers, artists and philosophers of the Renaissance offer many images of what it means to be human. As we investigate the peculiar nature of those imaginings, we are likely to see premonitions of many modern assumptions and dilemmas. The writings of Boccaccio, Erasmus, Rabelais, More, Montaigne, Shakespeare and Cervantes will form the backbone of our reading. (H1, CT)

 

ENGL 367 The Modern Temper: Texts and Contexts (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement; or ENGL 210, ENGL 222 or ENGL 223; or permission of the instructor. (First semester—odd years/4 credits)  

A study of modern English literature and of the social and intellectual contexts that shaped that literature. The class will focus on works that reflect and continue to affect Western culture and its sense of the modern. Texts will include selections from poetry, fiction and nonfiction by authors such as James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden and Virginia Woolf. (H2, CT)

 

ENHN 368 American Landscapes: Environmental Literature in the United States (CORE— Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior or senior standing in the Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. (First semester—odd years/4 credits)

How does the American landscape function in our imagination, our policies, our lives? This course explores the wide and growing range of writings about the environment in the following arenas: literary, political, scientific, philosophical, autobiographical. Readings include Thoreau, Leo Marx, Aldo Leopold, Leslie Marmon Silko and Annie Dillard, as well as poets such as Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Gary Snyder and Mary Oliver. (H2, CT)

 

ENGL 375 Independent Study in Writing

Prerequisites: At least one course in the ENGL 200-209 sequence or ENGL 219, or permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1, 2 or 3 credits)

Independent work in writing a genre such as the essay, short story or poem. Conferences.

 

ENGL 399 Internship in English

Prerequisites: 21 credits in English and permission of the department chair. (Either semester/3-15 credits)

Supervised off-campus learning in an organization or institution approved by the department for an entire semester or an equivalent summer term. Grading is on a satisfactory/ unsatisfactory basis. May not be used to fulfill major requirements.

ENGL 405/505 The English Language

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. (Second semester—odd years/4 credits)

Basic linguistic concepts and methodology as applied to the English language—its history, structure, varieties and acquisition. Special emphasis on the social aspects of English.

 

ENGL 410/510 Literature for Adolescents

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. (Either semester/4 credits)

An overview of literature written for and about adolescents, focusing both on authors and various themes and topics, with an emphasis on contemporary material.

 

ENGL 420/520 Advanced Fiction Writing

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and ENGL 219 or instructor approval. (Second semester—odd years/4 credits)

This course follows up the ENGL 219 introductory creative writing course, and is designed for those students who are serious about refining their craft. It is also geared toward those students enrolled in the M.A. program in curriculum and instruction who are now or will soon be teaching creative writing. A key difference between ENGL 420/520 and 219 is that this course will be devoted entirely to fiction writing.

 

ENGL 421/521 Advanced Poetry Writing

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and ENGL 219 or instructor approval. (Offered as needed/4 credits)

This course follows up the ENGL 219 introductory creative writing course, and is designed for those students who are serious about refining their craft. It is also geared toward those students enrolled in the M.A. program in curriculum and instruction who are now or will soon be teaching creative writing. A key difference between ENGL 421/521 and 219 is that this course will be devoted entirely to the writing of poetry.

 

ENGL 441/541 Faulkner and Morrison

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and instructor approval. (Course offered as needed/4 credits)

An in-depth study of two writers who embrace language and celebrate the human spirit. Readings may include Faulkner’s The UnvanquishedThe Sound and the FuryLight in August and Absalom, Absalom!, as well as Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, SulaBeloved and Jazz. (WS)

ENGL 461/561 The Family in American Modern Drama (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and fulfillment of the Aesthetic Appreciation Literature Core requirement (Offered as needed/4 credits)  

Domestic Realism constitutes the dominant form in American Drama. This course considers ways in which American playwrights use family relationships to examine social, political metaphysical and aesthetic concerns. Readings include works by O’Neill, Hellman, Miller, Wilson, Norman and Shepard, as well as other playwrights. (H2, G)

 

ENHN 463/563 International Currents in Modern Fiction (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Open to juniors or seniors in the Honors Program or with permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)  

A consideration of recent fiction that transcends boundaries of nation and language; such literary internationalism raises concerns of ethnicity, religion and political allegiance. How does a novelist modulate from local concerns to a global readership? From Africa, the class may read Chinua Achebe and Nadine Gordimer; from the Arab world, Tayeb Salih; from the Far East, Shusaku Endo; from Europe, Italo Calvino; from Latin America, Gabriel García Márquez; and from “America,” Vladimir Nabokov. (H2, CT)

 

ENGL 470/570 Seminar

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and 9 credits in literature at the 200 level or above. (Both semesters/4 credits)

Advanced study in an area of current interest to faculty and students, including an introduction to major schools of contemporary criticism. Juniors and seniors will explore a topic, period, author or question in literary history or theory.

 

ENTH 303 Elements of Playwriting

Prerequisites: ENGL 100, 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139 and ENGL 219. May not be taken on an audit basis. (Spring semester—even years/4 credits)

This workshop-based course is an immersion in the creative process of the playwright. Each student-playwright will begin to understand how to move from initial conception to the execution of a sketch, scene, one-act or full-length play for the stage. Each student-playwright will be introduced to the fundamentals of writing for the stage and will complete a first draft of either a one-act or a full-length play.

 

ENTH 229 History of Drama and Theatre I (CORE--Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature)

 

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (First semester/4 credits).

This course will examine the history, development, themes, characters, literary devices, and production values of a variety of theatre and drama, including Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, Renaissance Italy, Elizabethan England, Asia, 17th c. France, 18th c. England, and 18th and 19th c. America. Playwrights studied will include Sophocles, Aristophanes, liturgical dramatists, commedia performers, Shakespeare, Jonson, Chikamatsu, Molière, Sheridan, Tyler and Daly. (H1, G)

 

ENTH 230 History of Drama and Theatre II (CORE—Methods of Inquiry/Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature)

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. (First semester/3 credits)

This course will examine the history, development, themes, characters, literary devices, and production values of a variety of theatre and drama, including 19th c. Realism, Naturalism, Modernism and Postmodernism. Playwrights studied will include Ibsen, Wilde, Chekhov, O'Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, Beckett, Pinter, Shepard, Mamet, Wilson and Kushner. (H2, G)

 

ENGL 202 Intermediate Expository Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101, or 3 credits from ENGL 110-139. May not be taken on an audit basis. (Both semesters/4 credits)

Intensive practice in the clear and effective exposition of ideas, with stress on organization and precision of word choice. Individual conferences in addition to class meetings.

 

ENGL 301 Medieval Drama

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 222, or permission of Instructor. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

In this course, we will read, research, and perform early English drama. Our study will encompass many types of theatre from the period: lively Biblical episodes, sweeping saints’ lives, shocking miracle stories, clever tales of mischief, suspenseful battles for the soul, and witty, lighthearted interludes. We will consider these plays as pop culture, deeply enmeshed in the religious, political, and civic life of their age, as well as exploring how and why these plays have been categorized as “medieval” despite their continued flourishing throughout the Tudor period and beyond. All primary text readings will be in Middle English, but no previous coursework in the medieval period is required. (H1, G)

ENGL 364 Utopian Thought in the Western World (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the Aesthetic Appreciation/Literature requirement or ENGL 210, ENGL 222, or ENGL 223 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—odd years/4 credits)

A study of utopian thought from Plato's Republic through contemporary science fiction. Texts may include St. Augustine’s City of GodThe Rule of St. Benedict, Campanella's City of the Sun, More's Utopia, Bellamy's Looking Backward, Gilman's Herland, Huxley's Brave New World, as well as films such as Gattaca and Minority Report. The course will also include a study of experimental utopian communities.

 

ENGL 319 Creative Nonfiction

<p><em>Prerequisite: ENGL 219 (Second semester— even years/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>This workshop-based  course follows ENGL 219 and  involves a concentrated  study of the art of creative nonfiction. Students will gain an awareness and appreciation  of the elements of creative nonfiction,  and in particular, the personal  essay. During the workshop portion  of the course, students will write and present  original  essays and  comment  on the essays of other members,  both  orally  and in writing.</p>

CL 502 Classical Mythology (Humanities Elective)

Study of major works of Greek and Roman literature, their use of history and myth and their influence in the Western world.

CMA 550 Television in America (Humanities Elective)

(Either semester/3 credits) 

An examination of the cultural, political and sociological effects of television on 20th century America. The course will offer a brief history of the development of television, and then examine such issues as television and violence; television and children; television and politics; and television and society.

ENGL 500 Old English Language and Literature (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—even years/3 credits) 

This course will teach you the elements of Old English, the distant ancestor of the language we speak today, which flourished between ca. 500-1100 A.D. By our sixth class meeting, you will be translating Old English. By our fifteenth class meeting, you will be translating complete texts and placing them in the cultural context of Anglo-Saxon England. The work we do in this course will expose you to the very roots of the language and culture that anchored England, and then America.

ENGL 505/405 The English Language (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

Basic linguistic concepts and methodology as applied to the English language—its history, structure, varieties and acquisition.

AREN 508 Dante and Giotto (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An exploration of the culture of late medieval Florence, addressing such topics as the physical environment of the city, the Florentine historical perspective, spiritual and aesthetic sensibilities. The course will focus on two of the greatest artists of the period: Dante Alighieri and Giotto. (In May, after final exams, students will be offered the opportunity to travel to Italy—Florence, Siena, Padua and Assisi—as a group.)

ENGL 510/410 Literature for Adolescents (Humanities Elective)

(Either semester/3 credits) 

An overview of literature written for and about adolescents, focusing both on authors and various themes and topics, with an emphasis on contemporary material.

ENGL 513 Shakespeare (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester/3 credits) 

This course is an introduction to the dramatic works of Shakespeare. Although we devote some attention to the historical moment in which he produced his plays, our primary focus is on Shakespeare’s language and theater. Filmed versions of the plays will be used to supplement textual analysis.

ENGL 514/414 Shakespeare on Film (Humanities Elective)

(Summer as needed/3 credits) 

An examination of how directors have adapted Shakespeare’s plays to the medium of film. Our work will involve close reading of six plays and analysis of 12 to 15 film versions. Each student will present a seminar paper at the end of the course.

ENGL 520/420 Advanced Fiction Writing (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course is geared toward those students enrolled in the M.S. program in Curriculum and Instruction who are now or will soon be teaching creative writing. This course will be devoted entirely to fiction writing.

ENGL 518 Chaucer (Humanities Elective)

(First semester/3 credits) 

This course will focus on two goals: building a working knowledge of selections of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales (CT) and developing an understanding of Middle English culture and language through our reading of the texts. Through a close reading of CT, the textual, cultural and political issues important to Chaucer will become more clear. This class is not simply about learning about the writings and ideas of one man who died almost 600 years ago; rather, this course is designed to reinforce your critical skills of understanding ideas andculture through representative (and not so representative) texts.

ENGL 521/421 Advanced Poetry Writing (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course is geared toward those students enrolled in the M.S. program in Curriculum and Instruction who are now or will soon be teaching creative writing. This course will bentirely to the writing of poetry.

ENGL 541/441 William Faulkner and Toni Morrison (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

An in-depth study of two writers who embrace language and celebrate the human spirit. Readings may include Faulkner’s “The Unvanquished,” “The Sound and the Fury,” “Light in August,” “As I Lay Dying,” as well as Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye,” “Sula,” “The Song of Solomon” and “Beloved.”

ENGL 542 Jane Austen (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

A close analysis of the art of Jane Austen, emphasizing the resources of her language and her powers of social perception. Reading will include Austen’s six completed novels: “Sense and Sensibility,” “Pride and Prejudice,” “Mansfield Park,” “Emma,” “Northanger Abbey” and “Persuasion.”

ENGL 543 Yeats and Lawrence (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

An analysis of the lives, art and ideas of W.B. Yeats and D.H.Lawrence. Texts may include Yeats’ autobiography and poems, and Lawrence’s “Sons and Lovers,” “Women in Love” and “St. Mawr.”

ENGL 544 Woolf and Forster (Humanities Elective)

(3 credits) 

An analysis of the lives, art and ideas of W.B. Yeats and D.H.Lawrence. Texts may include Yeats’ autobiography and poems, and Lawrence’s “Sons and Lovers,” “Women in Love” and “St. Mawr.”

ENGL 544 Woolf and Forster (Humanities Elective)(2)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

An analysis of the lives, art and ideas of E. M. Forster and Virginia Woolf. Texts may include Forster’s “A Room with a View,” “Howard’s End” and “A Passage to India,” and Woolf’s “Mrs. Dalloway,” “To the Lighthouse” and “The Waves.”

ENGL 545 Hawthorne and Melville (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

The course is a close study of two major American authors of the mid 19th century, with an eye to their differing techniques in dealing with similar themes; in particular, the power of passion of human behavior and a generally tragic sense of life. Since at least for a time these two authors were in close personal contact with each other and were inspired by each other’s works, the course would use biographical information, as well as critical theory, to help illuminate the works in question. Class time would combine brief lectures with vigorous class discussion, with an emphasis on close readings of major texts.

ENGL 547 Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course is an in-depth study of the two most important poets of nineteenth-century America, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. In addition to a close examination of Whitman’s antebellum poetry and Civil War work and Dickinson’s manuscript fascicles and letters, the course will use recent criticism and biographical sources to help illuminate the works in question.

ENHN 560/460 The English and Italy: Texts and Contexts (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

A study of the impact of Italy on the literature and consciousness of British writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings will be selected from the poetry, fiction and nonfiction of writers such as Shelley, Byron, Ruskin, Elizabeth and Robert Browning, George Eliot, Henry James and D.H. Lawrence. Some attention will be paid to the history and art of Italy.

ENGL 561/461 The Family in American Modern Drama (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

Domestic Realism constitutes the dominant form in American Drama. This course considers ways in which American playwrights use family relationships to examine social, political metaphysical and aesthetic concerns. Readings include works by O’Neill, Hellman, Miller, Wilson, Norman and Shepard, as well as other playwrights.

ENHN 563/463 International Currents in Modern Fiction (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—even years/3 credits) 

A consideration of recent fiction that transcends boundaries of nation and language; such literary internationalism raises concerns of ethnicity, religion and political allegiance. How does a novelist modulate from local concerns to a global readership? From Africa we may read Chinua Achebe and Nadine Gordimer; from the Arab world, Tayeb Salih; from the Far East, Shusaku Endo; from Europe, Italo Calvino; from Latin America, Gabriand from “America,” Vladimir Nabokov.

ENGL 565 The Renaissance Amphibium (Humanities Elective)

(3 credits) 

A consideration of recent fiction that transcends boundaries of nation and language; such literary internationalism raises concerns of ethnicity, religion and political allegiance. How does a novelist modulate from local concerns to a global readership? From Africa we may read Chinua Achebe and Nadine Gordimer; from the Arab world, Tayeb Salih; from the Far East, Shusaku Endo; from Europe, Italo Calvino; from Latin America, Gabriel García Márquez; and from “America,” Vladimir Nabokov.

ENGL 565 The Renaissance Amphibium (Humanities Elective)(2)

(Second semester—even years/3 credits)  

As they move between two worlds—the infinite possibilities of spirit and the nightmarish limits of the physical—writers, artists and philosophers of the Renaissance offer many images of what it means to be human. As we investigate the peculiar nature of those imaginings, we are likely to see premonitions of many modern assumptions and dilemmas. The writings of Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Rabelais, More Montaigne, Shakespeare and Cervantes will form the backbone of our reading.

ENGL 567 The Modern Temper: Texts and Contexts (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

A study of modern English literature and of the social and intellectual contexts that shaped that literature. The class will focus its attention on works that reflect and continue to affect Western culture and its sense of the modern. Texts will include selections from poeand nonfiction of authors such as T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden and Virginia Woolf.

ENHN 568 American Landscapes: Environmental Literature in the United States (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

How does the American landscape function in our imagination, or policies or lives? This course explores the wide and growing range of writings about the environment in the following arenas: literary, political, scientific, philosophical, autobiographical. Readings include Thoreau, Leo Marx, Aldo Leopold, Leslie Marmon Silko and Annie Dillard, as well as poets such as Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Gary Snyder and Mary Oliver.

ENGL 570/470 Seminar (Humanities Elective)

(Both semesters/3 credits) 

Advanced study in an area of current interest to faculty and students, including an introduction to major schools of contemporary criticism. A topic, period, author or question in literary history or theory will be explored.

ENGL 502/402 William Blake (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

A study of the poetry and philosophy of the British poet, artist and visionary, William Blake (1757-1827), with an emphasis on the religious, philosophical and psychological implications of his poetry. Some attention will be paid to Blake’s painting and to the historical context that influenced the man and the poet

ENGL 546 Erdrich, Silko, Alexis (Humanities Elective)

(Second semester every three years/3 credits) 

A study of three of America’s most influential contemporary Native American writers. The class will explore these authors’ historic and cultural contexts to some degree. Readings may include Silko’s Ceremony and Storyteller, Erdrich’s Antelope Wife and Plague of Doves, and Alexie’s Indian Killer and Flight