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Courses Offered

HIST 367 Medieval Europe

<p><em>Prerequisite: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Offered every 3 years/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>A survey of the European Middle Ages, including political, social, economic and cultural developments from the fall of Rome through the 15th century.</p>

 

HIST 217 History of the United States to 1865 (CORE—Historical Analysis)

Credit by exam. (First semester/4 credits)

The development of the United States from the colonial settlements to 1865.

HIST 218 History of the United States since 1865 (CORE—Historical Analysis)

Credit by exam. (Second semester/4 credits)

The development of the United States as a world power from 1865 to the present.

HIST 340 Modern China and Japan (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: One of the following:  HIST 262 or HIST 263 (Second semester/4 credits)

The history of China and Japan in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the first contact with and response to the west, through Japanese modernization and imperialism; the Boxer uprising, 1911 revolution, and nationalism in China; and World War II and the Chinese communist era. The course will explore these and other major political, social and economic developments, with an emphasis on the international role of each country.

HSPS 345 Global Perspectives on Women, Power and Politics

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 262, HIST 263, PSCI 202, PSCI 210, PSCI 215, or permission of the instructor. (Course is offered as needed/4 credits)

An interdisciplinary, global perspective on women, power and politics. The course will focus on the different ways in which gender structures women’s political experiences and how race, class and ethnicity intersect with gender in shaping political consciousness and action. Readings will emphasize women’s power within established formal government structures as well as the informal exercise of power through religion, family and society. Their leadership in grassroots movements and contributions to nation building will be highlighted.

 

HIST 246 Introduction to Africa

(First semester/4 credits)

A study of the political, economic and cultural forces that have shaped the lives of the African people from the earliest beginning to the present. The approach will be to examine the major themes in the development of Africa. The focus will be on such topics as state formation, the slave trade, colonialism, nationalism, apartheid and the problems of nation building.

HIST 300 From Celts to Vikings, 400-1000

Prerequisite: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Offered every 3 years/4 credits)

A study of the peoples and culture of early medieval Europe, from the late Roman period through the 10th century. Topics include the Celtic population of the Roman Empire; “barbarian” kingdoms such as Celtic Ireland and Scotland, Anglo-Saxon England, Frankish Gaul and Visigothic and Islamic Spain; Christian missions; social and technological developments; the Carolingian Empire and its Renaissance; Viking Scandinavia and the impact of the Viking invasions on Europe; and the culture of the millennium.

HIST 309 Islam and the Crusades (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Offered every 3 years/ 4 credits)

A study of the “holy wars” between the Islamic world and the Christian west in the 11th through 15th centuries, including long-term effects on the modern Middle East.

HIST 410 History of Women in the United States

Prerequisite: Eight credits of history and junior or senior standing or by permission of instructor. (First semester—even years/ 4 credits)

This course explores the impact of historical events on the lives of American women and the varied roles women have played in shaping United States history from the colonial period to the present. It will focus specifically on how class, ethnicity and race have influenced American women’s work, family life and organized activities. Topics include: Native American women’s lives; gender and family life under slavery; the impact of industrialization on women of different classes; the ideology of separate spheres; women’s political activities including the antislavery movement, the suffrage movement, the Nineteenth Amendment and the resurgence of feminism in the 1960s; and transformations in the lives of modern women including work, politics, sexuality, consumption patterns and leisure activities.

 

HIST 313 Medieval England (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: HIST 262, or permission of the instructor. (Offered every 3 years/4 credits)

England’s political, social and cultural history from prehistoric times through the Anglo-Saxon era, the Norman Conquest, the development of Parliament and the War of the Roses.

HIST 314 Tudor and Stuart England

Prerequisite: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Offered every 3 years/4 credits)

British history in the 16th and 17th centuries, including the English Reformation, the reign of Elizabeth I, the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution.

HIST 316 The Middle East in Modern Times (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: HIST 263 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

A study of the Middle East in the modern world. Emphasis on the 20th century. National movements, Pan-Arabism, Zionism and the struggle over Palestine. The Arab-Israeli conflict, the Arab world, the influence of oil, terrorism and recent wars. Political, social and economic developments.

HIST 318 The American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1815 (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: HIST 217 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—as needed/4 credits)

This course examines the constitutional, political, economic, military and social developments during that period of American history encompassing the American Revolution, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution and the early republic through the War of 1812. Emphasis will be on the challenges facing the new nation, including the meanings of the American Revolution and how these meanings were manifested in the creation of the American republic.

HIST 319 The Civil War and Reconstruction

Prerequisite: HIST 217 or HIST 218. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

A study of America’s most destructive war: its origins, impact and aftermath. The course also will deal with the problems, accomplishments and failures of reconstruction.

HSLS 330 Cultural Encounters in Latin American History (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: Historical Analysis section of Core requirement. (Offered as needed/4 credits)

Employing a cross-cultural perspective, this course explores the historical process as being a dialogue between the cultures of the indigenous peoples of Latin America and the European settlement.

HIST 333 The History of Intelligence and Espionage since 1850

Prerequisites: HIST 218, and either PSCI 210 or PSCI 215, or permission of instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

The history of intelligence gathering since 1850. This course will focus on the history and development of American intelligence agencies, with major emphasis on intelligence gathering methods and espionage in the 20th century, both in warfare and in peacetime, especially in relation to national security. It will review the history of major foreign intelligence operations—for example Soviet and Russian, German, British, French and Israeli—and will give particular attention to intelligence efforts in the Cold War and the growth of the national security state. Post-9/11 developments in intelligence gathering will also be covered.

HIST 335 Teaching Assistantship in History

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, completion of course(s) involved or equivalent competency, and permission of the department. (Either semester/1 credit) 

The teaching assistant will have significant responsibilities in the assigned class or classes supporting the instruction of the course. Duties can include research, assisting with course instructional technology, tutoring class members and working on other class-related projects. May be taken only twice. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

HIST 336 The World since 1945

 

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 206, HIST 212, HIST 218, HIST 234, HIST 246 (Second semester—odd years/3 credits)

A study of major world developments since the end of World War II, including such topics as the reconstruction of Europe, the end of colonialism, the Cold War, the Middle East crisis, the nuclear age, terrorism and humanitarian crises and response.Themes will include war, politics, revolution and international cooperation.

 

HIST 344 Revolutions and Revolutionaries

Prerequisite: HIST 263 or permission of the instructor (Second semester—odd years/4 credits)

A study of the causes and nature of revolutions and the role of the revolutionary. Emphasis on the modern era—the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Russian Revolution and the Chinese Revolution. Also, the international struggle for labor and women’s rights.

HIST 353 U.S. Foreign Relations since World War II

Prerequisite: HIST 218 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

This course explores the history of America’s role in the world since the Second World War, examining the development of America’s position within the world community and the political, social and economic factors shaping its foreign policy. The course will cover such topics as the creation of the United Nations, the Cold War, Korea and Vietnam, détente, globalization and American involvement in the Middle East.

HIST 371A Topics in Early History

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (As needed/4 credits)

Advanced topics in ancient and medieval history. This course offers a chance to pursue in more detail subjects only touched upon in broad survey courses, or those not covered elsewhere in the history curriculum. Format, perspectives and topics may vary according to the instructor’s expertise. Students who lack the prerequisite, but who have other coursework or experience relevant to the specific topic, are encouraged to seek the instructor’s permission to enroll.

HIST 371B Topics in American History

 

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 217, HIST 218, AFHS 257, or permission of the instructor. (As needed/4 credits)

Advanced topics in colonial American and United States history. This course offers a chance to pursue in more detail subjects only touched upon in broad survey courses, or those not covered elsewhere in the history curriculum. Format, perspectives and topics may vary according to the instructor’s expertise. Students who lack the prerequisite, but who have other coursework or experience relevant to the specific topic, are encouraged to seek the instructor’s permission to enroll.

 

HIST 371C Topics in Modern European History

Prerequisite: HIST 263 or permission of the instructor. (As needed/4 credits)

Advanced topics in the history of modern Europe. This course offers a chance to pursue in more detail subjects only touched upon in broad survey courses, or those not covered elsewhere in the history curriculum. Format, perspectives and topics may vary according to the instructor’s expertise. Students who lack the prerequisite, but who have other coursework or experience relevant to the specific topic, are encouraged to seek the instructor’s permission to enroll.

HIST 371D Topics in World History (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

 

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 262 or HIST 263 or permission of the instructor. (As needed/4 credits)

Advanced topics in comparative and non-western world history. This course offers a chance to pursue in more detail subjects only touched upon in broad survey courses, or those not covered elsewhere in the history curriculum. Format, perspectives and topics may vary according to the instructor’s expertise. 

 

 

HIST 375 Independent Study in History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1-4 credits)

A readings course to supplement the regular offerings of the department. Conferences and written reports.

 

HIST 399 Internship in History

Prerequisites: 18 credits of history, or permission of the instructor. (Either semester/3 to 15 credits)

Supervised historical writing, research and/or museum work with private or governmental agencies full or part time. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

HIST 406/506 Religion, Family and Society in Reformation Europe

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and HIST 202, HIST 203, HIST 205, HIST 262 or REL 212 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—odd years/4 credits)

A study of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation and its impact on such aspects of European society as the family, marriage, women’s lives, popular culture, and urban and rural society. Topics covered will include the witch hunts of the 16th and 17th centuries. Students who lack the specific prerequisite but have extensive history or religion coursework are encouraged to seek instructor permission to enroll.

HIST 412/512 Women in Medieval Europe

Prerequisites: 8 credits in history and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (Offered as needed/4 credits)

A study of the roles and experience of European women during the Middle Ages, 500-1500. Legal and social status, queenship and power, religion and spirituality, marriage and family and women in the ethnic minorities.

AFHS 424/524 Race and Racism in the United States

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and HIST 217 or HIST 218 or AFHS 257 or permission of instructor. (Either semester—even years/4 credits)

The origins and development of racial attitudes, both scientific and popular, supporting mythologies, and contemporary institutional expressions. Emphasis on an historic overview of racism from the first English contacts with Africans and Indians in the late 16th century to the present and on political approaches to the problems of racism in American society.

HIST 208 Introduction to Public History

(First semester—even years/4 credits)

An overview of the field of history as practiced in museum work, historic preservation, state and national parks, archives, historic sites, historical societies and government agencies that employ historians. Students will utilize local resources and engage in hands-on projects. This is the foundation course for the Public History Concentration and is also open to all interested students.

HIST 437 U.S. Labor History from the Gilded Age to the 21st Century

<p><em>Prerequisite: Eight credits of history and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor  (First semester—even years/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>This course offers students a history of work, labor relations, social movements, and labor policy in the United States from the Gilded Age into the twenty-first century. Readings on industrial, agricultural, service, and domestic work, as well as on migration and immigration, will enable us to trace the history of class politics and economic development in modern America. The course also places American labor struggles within the context of global capitalism throughout the twentieth century. Our readings will reveal how the labor movement has wrestled with its role in politics in different time periods and its relation to the state and the courts, and, in turn, how the government impeded or encouraged labor organizing and workers’ rights over the last century.</p>

HIST 338 The Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1877-1929

Prerequisite: HIST 218 or permission of the instructor (First semester—odd years/4 credits)

Between 1877 and 1929, the United States wrestled with the wrenching social, political, cultural and economic transformations that accompanied the second industrial revolution. Additionally, America entered the world stage as an imperial power, experienced an unprecedented wave of immigration and witnessed the rise of cities that were far beyond the imagination of any of nation’s founders. This course will address the ways in which Americans responded to the crises caused by industrialization, immigration and urbanization with special emphasis on Progressive Era reform.

 

HIST 339 New Deal America, 1929-2000

Prerequisite: HIST 218 or permission of the instructor (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

This course traces the rise and fall of the New Deal order from the Great Crash of 1929 through the end of the millennium. The first part of the course will discuss the social, political and economic legacies of the New Deal and U.S. participation in World War II. The second part focuses on the turbulent 1960s, when the women’s rights, civil rights and anti-war movements reached high tide. The final part of the course will examine the causes and consequences of economic crises of the 1970s and America’s “conservative turn” under Reagan in the 1980s.

HIST 371E Topics in Public History

 Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 208, HIST 217, HIST 218, HIST 299B or permission of the instructor. (As needed/4 credits)

Advanced topics in public history (museum studies; historic preservation; archives; and history practiced in state and national parks, historic sites, and historical societies). This course offers a chance to pursue in more detail subjects only touched upon in broad survey courses, or those not covered elsewhere in the history curriculum. Format, perspectives and topics may vary according to the instructor’s expertise. 

HIST 470/570 Seminar: Topics in History

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and HIST 270 or HIST 373. (Either semester-as needed/ 4 credits)

This advanced course explores the problems, methods, techniques, and ethics of historical research and inquiry. In the course, each student completes an extended research project using original primary sources from archives or other collections. Individual research topics are usually local or family history subjects. The project is completed in stages throughout the semester and presented to the seminar group. 

 

AFHS 257 African-American History (CORE—Western Civilization)

(First semester/4 credits)  A chronological survey of African-American history from pre-colonial Africa and colonial America through the twentieth century. Focuses on the economic, political, social and cultural context in which a uniquely constituted African-American culture developed in the course of the struggle to achieve human rights. Themes include African-American women and working-class African-Americans.

HIST 343 Modern Russia

Prerequisite: HIST 263 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)  History of Russia and the Soviet Union in the modern era (1855 to the present) from Alexander II and the Era of Great Reforms to the current Russian government and society. Topics include the fall of the Romanovs, the Bolshevik coup, Lenin, Stalin and their successors. The course will examine political, economic, intellectual and cultural developments under Communism and afterwards.

HIST 262 Africa, Asia and Europe to 1500 (CORE—Historical Analysis)

(Both semesters/4 credits)  An introduction to the origins of human society and early civilization on three continents. This course emphasizes building foundational knowledge for further study of these areas as well as the skills that students need for further historical study. Topics include African cultures, Mesopotamia and Egypt, Vedic India, ancient Greece and Rome, imperial China, and medieval Europe and Japan. The complex development of and interactions between cultures are also examined.

HIST 263 Africa, Asia and Europe from 1500 (CORE—Historical Analysis)

 (Both semesters/4 credits)

An introduction to how historical developments since 1500 on three continents have shaped our contemporary world. This course emphasizes building foundational knowledge for further study of these areas as well as the skills that students need for further historical study. Topics include Renaissance and Reformation Europe, African kingdoms and the Atlantic slave trade, Mughal India, Ming and Qing China, Meiji Japan, European Imperialism, industrialization, the two World Wars, and decolonization. Interactions between regions and cultures are examined throughout the course.

HIST 373 Research and Writing in History

Prerequisites: Open to history majors with at least sophomore standing and HIST 217 or HIST 218 or AFHS 257 plus another history course. (Both semesters/4 credits)  This seminar introduces students to the methods of historical research and writing, including historical argumentation, evidence, documentation and archival research. In the course, each student completes an extended research project on a local or family history topic, using original primary sources from archives or other collections. The project is completed in stages throughout the semester and is presented to the seminar group. Students also visit local archives and research collections. The course is the entry into the major; it should be taken by second-semester sophomores, first-semester juniors, and new transfer students.

HIST 341 Cultural Resources and Events

Prerequisite: Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1 credit)  This course encourages students to partake of and reflect thoroughly on the abundance of cultural resources available on campus and in the greater Frederick area (including Baltimore and Washaington, DC). During the semester, students will attend historically-themed public events and visit historical museums and sites; they will also discuss their experiences and complete related reading and writing assignments.

HIST 342 Short Topics in History

Prerequisite: Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor. (Either semester-As needed/1 credit)  Short Topics in History is a 1-credit course that offers a chance to pursue in more detail more focused study of subjects only touched upon in broad survey courses, or those not covered elsewhere in the history curriculum. Format, perspectives and topics may vary according to the instructor's expertise.

HIST 399C Internship Colloquium

Corequisite: HIST 399 or permission of the instructor. (Both semesters/1 credit)

This one-credit seminar, taken together with the History internship, consists of readings, discussion and writing that will deepen and enrich students' internship experience. In regular meetings throughout the semester, the seminar group will discuss the assigned texts as well as their work sites, current issues in public history, and professionalism in the history-related workplace. Students will make presentations at the end of the course on their internship work.

HIST 365 The Ancient Near East and Greece

<p><em>Prerequisite: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Offered as needed/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>The course traces the early history of western civilization, from the origins of humanity in Africa, through the earliest civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt, to classical Greece and the Hellenistic era. The emphasis will be on the forms and varieties of political, social, military and religious organization, the shaping of individual and collective identity, and the interaction and competition between states, religious authorities and cultures.</p>

HIST 368 Early Modern Europe, 1517-1789

<p><em>Prerequisite: HIST 263 (Offered every 3 years/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>A survey of the major political, economic, cultural and social aspects of the European experience during the early modern period. Beginning with the Protestant Reformation and wars of religion, and continuing through the establishment of the modern state system in the mid-seventeenth century, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the course focuses most on those ideas that informed, challenged and altered the organization of European societies and the interaction of European peoples in a global context during the early modern period. Examples include constitutionalism, absolutism, rationalism, nationalism and imperialism.</p>

HIST 369 Modern Europe, 1789-2000

<p><em>Prerequisite: HIST 263 or permission of the instructor. (Offered every 3 years/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>A study of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the French Revolution through the two World Wars to the age of the European Union. The course examines the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of the modern European experience. Events, ideas, individuals, and institutions of particular concern include the rise of nationalism, socialism and communism, humanitarianism, imperialism, democracy, and the labor movement.</p>

HIST 346 War and Society

<p><em>Prerequisite: One of the following: HIST 217, HIST 218, HIST 262 or HIST 263, or permission of the instructor. (Offered as needed/4 credits)</em></p>

<p>A study of modern war and its effects on people and nations in a historical perspective. Analysis of the causes of war. Survey of the tools and weapons of war and the changes in weapons and technology over time. Reactions of soldiers, civilians and political leaders to the demands of war.</p>

HIST 366 Ancient Rome

Prerequisite: HIST 262 or permission of the instructor. (Offered as needed/4 credits)

An exploration of the history of Rome, from its founding through the Republic and the Empire, focusing on political, social, cultural and military developments.

AFAM 570/470 African-American Feminist Thought (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

An examination of African-American feminist scholarship in the 19th and 20th centuries, as African-American women grappled with the issues of gender, race and class. Focus on African-American women’s perspectives and diverse experiences within the context of changing political, economic and social structures. Primary and secondary writings by African- American feminists in various disciplines will be used to understand the issues, agendacontending philosophies, organizational strategies and alliances proposed.

AFHS 524/424 Race and Racism in the United States (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—even years/3 credits) 

The origins and development of racial attitudes, both scientific and popular, supporting mythologies and contemporary institutional expressions. Emphasis on a historic overview of racism from the first English contacts with Africans and Indians in the late 16th century to the present and on political approaches to the problems of racism in American society.

AFPS 501 African-American Political Autobiography (Humanities Elective)

(Course is offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course examines the connections between autobiography, political philosophy, utopian thought and politics in African-American autobiographies. Selected African-American political autobiographies will be analyzed to determine the criticisms authors launched against their societies, the social and political alternatives suggested, and the agencies they suggbe mobilized to institute change.

AFPS 553 Contemporary African Political Thought (Humanities Elective)

(Course is offered as needed/3 credits) 

An introduction to African political thought from the pre-colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be given to the impact of Islam, cultural nationalism, nationalism, revolutionary theories, democracy, African socialism and Marxism of major African political theorists.

HIST 506/406 Religion, Family and Society in Reformation Europe (Humanities Elective)

(First semester -—odd years/3 credits) 

A study of the Protestant Reformation and its impact on aspects of European society such as the family, marriage, women’s lives, popular culture and urban and rural society.

HIST 510 History of Women in the United States (Humanities Elective)

(First semester—even years/3 credits) 

This course explores the impact of historical events on the lives of American women and the varied roles women have played in shaping United States’ history from the colonial period to the present. It will focus specifically on how class, ethnicity and race has influenced American women’s work, family life and organized activities. Topics include: Native American women’s lives; gender and family life under slavery; the impact of industrialization on women of different classes; the ideology of separate spheres; women’s political activities including the antislavery movement, the suffrage movement, the Nineteenth Amendment and the resurgence of feminism in the 1960s; and transformations in the lives of modern women including work, politics, sexuality, consumption patterns and leisure activities. While tracing larger trends and identifying common experiences, the course pays close attention to the specific experiences of individual women in order to shed light on the differences and divisions among them. Throughout, it investigates the ways in which notions of gender difference have changed over time and how a wide variety of women both created and responded to shifting and contested cultural, political and social roles.

HIST 512/412 Women in Medieval Europe (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

A study of the roles and experience of European women during the Middle Ages, 500-1500. Legal and social status, queenship and power, religion and spirituality, marriage and family and women in the ethnic minorities.

HIST 520 America in the Sixties (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course provides both a chronological and topical examination of the period of American history known as “the sixties.” Among the topics discussed are the American presidency, the Cold War, nuclear proliferation, the rise and fall of the New Left, the rebirth of the New Right, the women’s movement, the freedom struggles, the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement, the student movement, Watergate, rock-n-roll music, American popular culture and oppositional culture. Through the available media on the ‘60s—including books and articles, movies, documentaries and sound recordings—we will search for coherence in a contradictory and confusing period of American history.

HIST 521/421 Hollywood’s America (Humanities Elective)

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course examines American culture and society through film. The primary text for this course will be American films, such as “Gone With the Wind,” “The Birth of a Nation,” “The Grapes of Wrath,” “Casablanca,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “The Graduate,” “Apocalypse Now,” “Wall Street” and “American Beauty.” Students will critically analyze how American cultural and social conflicts are portrayed and worked out in popular films, and explore how motion pictures create a window into modern American society.

AFHS 524/424 Race and Racism in the United States (Humanities Elective)

(First semester -—even years/3 credits) 

The origins and development of racial attitudes, both scientific and popular, supporting mythologies and contemporary institutional expressions. Emphasis on a historic overview of racism from the first English contacts with Africans and Indians in the late 16th century to the present and on political approaches to the problems of racism in American society.