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Courses Offered

AFPY 270 African-American Psychological Perspectives

(Second semester/4 credits)

This course will explore the theories, research and practices of African-American psychology. Focuses on understanding of the forces that have influenced this unique, coherent and persistent psychological perspective. Themes include definition and development of African- American psychology; issues related to identity and personality development of African- Americans; and evaluation of psychological principles, theories and assessment techniques in relation to the personality and behavioral development of African-Americans.

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (CORE—Social and Behavioral Analysis)

Credit by exam. (Both semesters/4 credits)

An introduction to the basic methods, principles and facts of modern psychology contributing to an understanding of human behavior and experience. Selected students may be eligible for an honors section of this course.

PSY 203 Survey of Clinical, Community and Counseling Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 101. (Second semester/4 credits)

An introduction to the practice of psychology as applied to the prevention, assessment and treatment of mental health problems. Focus is on such topics as the theoretical bases for therapeutic skills and methods, principles and ethics of testing and treatment, historical and current issues and trends and the relevance of research to application.

PSY 204 Psychology of Death

(First semester/4 credits)

The psychological aspects of death are studied. Topics include euthanasia, suicide, the grief process, fears and attitudes toward death, care of the terminally ill and ethical issues related to death and dying. Emphasis is on seeing death as a natural function of life and on helping individuals deal with this inevitable event in an open and honest way.

PSY 205 Social Psychology

(Both semesters/4 credits)

The scientific study of the social behavior of individuals as they interact with others. Topics include: perception of others, affiliation, interpersonal attraction, aggression, small group dynamics, leadership, conformity, conflict, group decision making and productivity, altruism, attitude formation and change. Theories are presented and applied to broader social questions such as prejudice, interpersonal relationships, effects of urbanization and women’s roles in society.

PSY 206 Psychology of Women

Prerequisite: PSY 101. (Both semesters/4 credits)

A survey of biological and environmental factors that affect the development of behaviors, attitudes and personality traits in women at different stages in their life cycle. Theoretical and empirical approaches to a better understanding of the values, goals, problems and abilities of women will be considered.

PSY 208 Psychology of Adolescence

Prerequisite: PSY 101. (First semester/4 credits)

The psychological development of the normal individual from the beginning of puberty to the attainment of maturity. Research findings are examined for the purpose of understanding and guiding the development of adolescents in the home, the school, the peer group and the community.

PSY 211 Elementary Statistics (CORE—Foundation)

Prerequisite: Level II placement on the Basic Math Skills Inventory, MATH 099 or equivalent mathematics background. Not open to students who have received credit for ECMG 212, MATH 112 or SOC 261 (Both semesters and summer/4 credits)

Statistical methods, including frequency distributions and graphing, averages, measures of variability and correlation, t-tests, analysis of variance and several distribution-free tests. Examples are drawn from the social, behavioral and biological sciences.

PYSO 221 Social Gerontology

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101. (Second semester/4 credits)

A study of the social aspects of aging. This course explores the role of aged individuals within society and the influence society has on them. Topics include health, income, housing, family relationships, retirement, leisure and institutionalization.

PSY 239 Developmental Psychology

(Second semester/4 credits)

Introduction to the basic concepts and issues of psychological and biological growth and development from conception through old age. Emphasis is placed on biophysical, cognitive and psychosocial development throughout the lifetime, as well as the important roles of gender and culture in this process. Applied aspects of developmental psychology are emphasized in this course.

PSY 312 Non-Experimental Research Methods

Prerequisites: PSY 101 or its equivalent and PSY 211 (“C-” minimum grade) or permission of instructor. (First semester/4 credits/6 class and laboratory hours)

This integrated lecture and laboratory course exposes students to the significance and utility of proper research methodology. It focuses on the nonexperimental research designs, specifically on correlational, quasi-experimental, and single-case designs as well as on qualitative research (i.e., naturalistic observations, case studies, and archival research). Students create and implement their own survey as well as code, analyze, and interpret the data collected from it. Tutorials on the PsycINFO database as well as APA style lead to reviews of existing research literature and selection of a topic for an experiment to be conducted in PSY 315.

PSY 315 Experimental Research Methods

Prerequisite: PSY 312 (“C-” minimum grade) (Second semester/4 credits/6 class and laboratory hours)

This course is a continuation of PSY 312 exposing students to the significance and utility of proper research methodology. It focuses on experimental research designs, specifically on between participants, within participant and mixed designs. An independent experiment of the student’s choice is performed throughout the semester, culminating in a final manuscript and poster presented to the College community.

PSY 319 Drugs and Behavior

Prerequisite: PSY 101 (Second semester/4 credits)

Examines the major classes of drugs that affect behavior, including drugs of abuse and drugs used in the treatment of mental disorders. The course includes exploration of the historical background of drugs and drug use, as well as social context.

PSY 335 Teaching Assistantship in Psychology

Prerequisites: 20 credits of psychology including PSY 312 and 315, and permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1-4 credits)

A teaching practicum for advanced psychology majors with regularly scheduled hours assisting in PSY 101, 312 and 315. Hours will include regular consultations with course instructor regarding teaching experiences, methods and issues. Hours may include tutoring, administration of quizzes, grading of laboratory reports and quizzes and preparation for classroom demonstrations. Relevant reading and a paper will be required. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSY 370 Seminar in Contemporary Issues

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of department. (Either semester/4 credits)

The study of selected issues and/or social problems that are of interest to psychologists. Each issue will be examined from the various perspectives of specialists within the discipline. Students will participate through readings in primary sources, individual reports, discussion and possible field work.

PSY 373 Psychology of Aging

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

A study of the psychological functioning of the aged adult. Examination of the psycho- physiological changes that occur with age that have an effect on the individual’s neural structure, biological functioning, cognitive abilities, personality development and social interactions. Consideration of the special methodological and research design problems of studying aging adults. The current research literature, along with text materials, will be discussed.

PSY 375 Independent Study in Psychology

Prerequisites: 6 credits in psychology and permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1-4 credits)

Investigation of a psychological problem or issue according to individual interests.

PSY 399 Internship in Psychology

Prerequisites: 18 credits in psychology and permission of the department. (Either semester/4-12 credits)

Individualized study and work in a cooperating laboratory or professional setting. Provides an opportunity to work with professionals in the field and to participate in research or other activities. Site approval and components of each student’s internship must be approved by and coordinated with the department. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSY 401 Theories of Personality

Prerequisites: Open to psychology majors with junior or senior standing, 12 credits in psychology, minimum 2.0 cumulative gpa, or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

An overview of the different approaches to the understanding of the personality. Emphasis is placed on the normal personality.

PSY 409 Learning and Memory

Prerequisite: Open to psychology majors with junior or senior standing. (Second semester/4 credits)

A contemporary survey of methods, theories, principles and processes in the fields of learning and memory. The course focuses on understanding the building blocks of behavior in human and nonhuman learning, and operant conditioning, as well as exploration of higher-order processes (e.g., language, pattern learning).

PSY 418 Physiological Psychology

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 312, open to psychology majors with junior or senior standing, 12 credits in psychology, minimum 2.0 cumulative gpa, or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

Explores the relationships among physiological structure, functioning and behavior. Special attention is given to the overall structure of the nervous system, as well as the physiological bases of sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, emotion and consciousness.

PSY 431 Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisites: Open to psychology majors with junior or senior standing, 12 credits in psychology, minimum of 2.0 cumulative gpa, or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

The origins, symptoms and methods of treatment of the principal forms of deviant behavior, with illustrative case material. Social as well as clinical aspects of individual psychological problems are considered.

PSY 434 Tests and Measurements

Prerequisite: Open to psychology majors with junior or senior standing, 12 credits in psychology, minimum 2.0 cumulative gpa, or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

A study of the testing movement, including fundamental statistical procedures. Emphasizes the use of tests in education, industry and clinical practice. Observation and participation in individual and group testing.

PSY 441 History of Psychology (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 12 credits in psychology, minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA, or permission of the instructor. (Both semesters/4 credits)

The history of psychology and modern psychological theories.

PSY 456 Behavior Modification

Prerequisite: Open to psychology majors with junior or senior standing, 12 credits in psychology, minimum 2.0 cumulative gpa, or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

Application of operant and respondent learning principles to behavior problems of individuals and groups where the procedures for effecting therapeutic change involve the systematic manipulation of physical, social and psychological variables. Considers applications to education, child rearing, counseling, prisons and institutions for the retarded or the mentally ill.

PSY 500 Human Development as a Lifelong Process

(First semester/3 credits)

Issues, theories, stages, tasks and biological and environmental determinants are considered as they apply to physical, language, cognitive, learning, social, moral and personality development. A basic human sciences course.

PSY 501 Theories of Personality

(First semester/3 credits)

An overview of the different approaches to the understanding of the personality. Emphasis is placed on the normal personality.

PSY 505 Social Psychology: A Survey

(Interdisciplinary: psychology and sociology/Both semesters/3 credits)

The scientific study of the social behavior of individuals as they interact with other individuals. Topics include: perception of others, affiliation, interpersonal attraction, aggression, small group dynamics, leadership, conformity, conflict, group decision making, altruism, attitude formation and change. Facts and theories are presented and applied to broader social questions such as racial prejudice, interpersonal relationships, women’s roles and the effects of urbanization. Many in-class projects are undertaken to illustrate course materials. A basic human sciences course.

PSY 508 Introduction to Counseling and Helping Skills

(First semester/3 credits)

Designed to effect the acquisition of basic competency in interpersonal communication skills and introductory knowledge of the helping professions. The core dimensions of a model of the helping relationship and basic skills of attending and responding are presented in a systematic intensive training group experience. Readings and class discussions focus on client needs throughout the life span, counselor role and ethics, history and status of counseling as a profession and present and future work settings. (Due to the experiential nature of the course, grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.)

PSY 509 Learning and Memory

(Second semester/3 credits)

A contemporary survey of methods, theories, principles and processes in the fields of learning and memory. The course focuses on understanding the building blocks of behavior in human and nonhuman learning, and operant conditioning, as well as exploration of higher-order processes (e.g., language, pattern learning.

PSY 511 Theories and Principles of Counseling

(First semester/3 credits)

Introduction to the literature and leading theoretical approaches to counseling with emphasis on philosophical assumptions and theories of personality that underlie counseling goals and intervention techniques applicable to various client needs.

PSY 518 Physiological Psychology

Prerequisites: Introductory level courses in psychology and biology, a course in research methods or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits)

Explores the relationships between physiological structure and functioning and behavior. Special attention is given to the overall structure of the nervous system, as well as the physiological bases of sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, emotion, and consciousness.

PSY 531 Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite: A course in general psychology, or permission of the department.(Summer semester/3 credits)

The origins, symptoms and methods of treatment of the principal forms of deviant behavior, with illustrative case material. Social as well as clinical aspects of individual psychological problems are considered.

PSY 534 Tests and Measurements

(First semester/3 credits)

A study of the testing movement, including fundamental statistical procedures. Emphasizes the use of tests in education, industry and clinical practice. Observation and participation in individual and group testing.

PSY 556 Behavior Modification

(Interdisciplinary: psychology, education, sociology/Summer/3 credits)

Application of operant and respondent learning principles to behavior problems of individuals and groups where the procedures for effecting therapeutic change involve the systematic manipulation of physical, social and psychological variables. Considers applications to education, child rearing, counseling, prisons and institutions for the retarded or the mentally ill.

PSY 575R Research Literature Review

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 credit)

A thorough survey and critical evaluation of scholarly articles, books, and other sources relevant to a particular area of research or theory in the Human Sciences. The final written paper must conform to the APA’s guidelines and must be submitted to the instructor by the end of the term. Evidence of an approved topic with a signed Permission to Enroll Form must be submitted to the Graduate School at the time of registration.

PSY 580 Master’s Thesis Preparation

(6 credits)

The master’s thesis should exhibit those qualities which are associated with genuine research: scholarship, logical consistency, creativity and comprehensiveness. The student should submit, in writing, after appropriate and extensive reading, a tentative thesis proposal. This proposal must contain a clear definition of the problem, a justification of the research, a review of previous research, a proposed method of investigation and a tentative bibliography. When the thesis proposal has been approved by a committee composed of the student’s adviser and two other members of the department faculty, the student must submit a signed cover sheet to the Graduate School Office. After official approval, the student will be registered and may begin work on the thesis. It is expected that the thesis will be completed in such a way that the finished product may be judged satisfactory as a partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s degree. The final report must follow the APA guidelines for research papers.

PSY 590 Teaching Assistantship

Prerequisites: By invitation of the department. (1-3 credits)

A teaching practicum for advanced Human Sciences students with regularly scheduled hours assisting in selected undergraduate psychology courses. Hours will include regular consultations with course instructor regarding teaching experiences, methods and issues. Hours will include a variety of course related work. Grading will be on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSY 595 Independent Research Project

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3 credits)

A basic or applied research project involving extended independent work. Relying on principles of research design, this course involves the conceptualization, implementation, statistical analysis and interpretation, and written report resulting from an independent experimental or correlational study. Evidence of an approved topic with a signed Permission to Enroll Form must be submitted to the Graduate School at the time of registration.