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Courses Offered

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology (CORE—Social and Behavioral Analysis)

Open to all students. Credit by exam. (Both semesters/4 credits)

Fundamental sociological perspectives, processes, concepts and issues. Overview of the study of social structure, social organization, social institutions, social interaction, inequality, culture and social change.

SOC 215 Social Problems (CORE—Social and Behavioral Analysis)

(First semester/4 credits)

A systematic study of the institutional roots and social consequences of major social problems: poverty, the environment, inequality, crime and the quality of education and work and family life. Includes critical analysis of assumptions underlying popular and theoretical explanations of social problems as well as programs and policies aimed at alleviating them.

SOC 216 Criminology

Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Second semester/4 credits)

An introduction to the sociological analysis of crime. Explores dominant theoretical perspectives on the causes of and responses to crime and criminal behavior, the definition and measurement of crime, inequalities in the criminal justice system and policies directed at crime.

SOSW 217 Juvenile Delinquency

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOWK 201. (First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An examination of major theories and research about the causes of juvenile delinquency and various approaches to its control, prevention and treatment: juvenile court, correctional agencies and community-based programs; and strategies for working with delinquent and at-risk youth.

PYSO 221 Social Gerontology

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101. (Second semester/4 credits)

A study of the social aspects of aging. This course explores the role of aged individuals within society and the influence society has on them. Topics include health, income, housing, family relationships, retirement, leisure and institutionalization.

SOC 259 Sociological Theory

Prerequisite: SOC 101. (First semester/4 credits)

An examination of the roots and development of the most important classical thinkers in sociology. The major emphasis in the course will be on Marx, Durkheim and Weber.

 

SOC 260 Methods of Social Research

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

An introduction to the philosophy, logic, and basic research methods of the social sciences. Includes an examination of the fundamental ideas and principles underlying the scientific study of human behavior and the social world as well as the research designs and techniques, both quantitative and qualitative, commonly used in social research: experiments, surveys, content analysis, field research, historical-comparative research, and program evaluation.

SOC 261 Quantitative Methods for the Social Sciences (CORE—Foundation)

Prerequisites: SOC 260 or permission of instructor and MATH 099 or Level II placement on the Basic Math Skills Inventory. (Second semester/4 credits)

An introduction to the methods used to analyze and interpret quantitative social science data with an applied focus. Topics include using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, locating and downloading data sets from the internet, reading and interpreting quantitative social science research reports (including surveys, evaluation research, and observational and experimental designs), and the effective communication of quantitative results in written and visual forms. Some attention is also given to descriptive statistics and measures of central tendency, hypothesis testing, the logic of inferential statistics, and choosing the appropriate statistical application for a given research problem.

SOC 300 Social Inequality

Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Second semester/4 credits)

A systematic and analytical examination of the organization of social inequality in society. Major theoretical and research problems in the study of stratification; the forms and functions, characteristics, correlates and consequences of stratification; the distribution of wealth and power; and the relationship of social stratification to social mobility, ideology and societal institutions. Includes an assessment of social inequality in terms of race, class, status, ethnicity, religion and sex.

 

SOC 308 Sociology of Sexuality

Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An examination of how patterns of social behavior are institutionalized in a set of cultural and organizational arrangements and the resulting consquences for individuals across race, ethnicity, class, sex and religions. Emphasis is on examining the role of dominant gender paradigms and U.S. institutions, such as family, work, politics, military and religion, in controlling sexual behaviors.

SOC 310 Topics in Sociology

Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Either semester/3 credits). 

An examination of relevant concepts, issues, theories and research literature pertaining to a selected substantive area in sociology. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

SOC 310B Gender and Crime

An examination of how gender construction is reproduced throughout the criminal justice system. Sociological constructs such as gender socialization, gender roles, gender within institutions and gender related violence will provide the theoretical tools of analysis. Emphasis will be placed on the intersection of gender with race, ethnicity and class. Topics will include women and men as offenders, victims and professionals in the criminal justice system. Special interest will include children of prisoners, juvenile delinquency among girls and nontraditional forms of female offending.

SOC 311 Sociology of Gender (CORE—Western Civilization)

Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Second semester—even years/4 credits)

A critical assessment of gender constructs at both the individual and institutional level. Prominent gender theories, concepts and research methods will be compared, as will intersections of gender with race/ethnicity and class. Key institutions that may be analyzed include family, work, military, media, politics and religion.

SOC 318 Global Social Problems (CORE—Non-Western Civilization)

 Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

An analysis of social problems in a global context. The first part of the course focuses on the economic, political and cultural changes that have, in turn, produced changed both between and within countries. The second part focuses on the problems that have arisen as a result of globalization. Topics include: wealth and poverty; the global assembly line; gender, family and community; environment, terrorism and war; and health.

SOC 323 Ethnicity in the United States (CORE—Western Civilization)

(First semester/4 credits)

A survey of the status and treatment of ethnic groups in the United States: patterns of dominant and subordinate relations; prejudice and discrimination; historical and current problems; demographic and social background; political and social policies.

SOC 335 Undergraduate Teaching Assistantships

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of the course instructor. (Either semester/2 credits) 

Assist with a sociology course at the 100 or 200 level. Teaching assistants may attend classes, lead discussions and review sessions, tutor students, assist with grading, show films, distribute in-class exams and other tasks as assigned; they will also meet periodically with the instructor. Students may also be given the opportunity to develop and deliver an in-class lecture. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

SOC 353 Deviance and Social Control

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of the instructor. (First semester—even years/3 credits) 

A social constructionist approach to explaining non-normative behavior and its consequences. Analysis includes contextual processes affecting definitions of deviance as well as individual and institutional social control responses. Topics include substance use, family violence, body modification, belief systems, sexuality, mental disorders, physical disabilities and suicide.

SOC 375 Independent Study

Prerequisites: 6 credits in sociology and permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

Reading and/or research in a selected field of sociology.

SOC 399 Internship

Prerequisites: 12 hours of sociology and permission of the department. (Either semester/3-15 credits) 

Participation in a social action, research, advocacy, human service or other organization related to student’s interests and/or career goals. Site approval and components of each student’s internship must be approved by and coordinated with the department faculty. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

SOC 470 Seminar in Sociology

Prerequisites: SOC 101, SOC 259 and SOC 260. (Second semester/3 credits) 

This is a capstone course required of all sociology majors. Through the use of several texts, the course will analyze issues, debates and controversies in sociology. The topics and texts will vary.

SOC 482 Practicum in Social Research

Prerequisite: SOC 260 and SOC 261 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

Students apply social science research skills in projects undertaken independently or under the auspices of the Center for Community Research, working with local agencies on research that meets community-identified needs. Independent research and individual meetings with the instructor and/or agency staff are supplemented by assigned readings and a weekly one-hour class meeting devoted to topics such as using online research resources, writing a literature review, community-based vs. conventional research, questionnaire development, focus groups, and reporting quantitative and qualitative research results.

SOSW 312 Addictions

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOWK 201 or permission of instructor. (Second semester—odd years/3 credits)  An examination of current social scientific research and theory about different forms of addiction such as alcohol and other drugs, gambling, pornography, sex, food, and the internet. This is a cross-listed, interdisciplinary course whose main purpose is to give students both a sociological understanding of addiction in its different forms as well as familiarity with current programs, policies, and social work practice models for addressing the problem of addiction.

SOC 320A Skills Workshop: Career Preparation for Sociology Students

Prerequisite: Open to sociology majors with junior or senior status or permission of instructor. (Offered yearly/1 credit)  This is a weekly workshop in which students majoring or minoring in sociology and other social sciences learn how to apply the knowledge and skills they have gained to embark on a post-college career or graduate school. The course features readings, speakers, and carefully designed assignments and exercises, all of them aimed at helping students to understand the job market, identify meaningful career paths, articulate their own strengths to themselves and to prospective employers, make choices about graduate schoot and position themselves to secure employment after they leave Hood College.

SOC 320B Skills Workshop: Grant Proposals

Prerequisites: SOC 260 and SOC 261 or permission of instructor. (First semester/1 credit)  In this course, students acquire knowledge, skills, and experience in grant-proposal writing: identifying funding opportunities, making sense of grant application packets, developing an effective, evidence-based case for the program or research project, and writing and evaluating proposals.

SOC 320C Skills Workshop: Evaluation Research

Prerequisite: SOC 260 and SOC 261 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/1 credit)  This workshop will help students develop an understanding of evaluation research and experience in designing a program evaluation project. Topics include purposes of evaluation research, ethical and political issues, identifying measurable outcomes, and strengths and limitations of differential methodological approaches. Students will develop an evaluation research design for a program in the Frederick community.

SOWK 201 Introduction to Social Work and the Human Services

Prerequisite: None. Participation in 40 hours of volunteer service is required to reinforce the course material. (First semester/4 credits) 

An introduction to the helping process in social work and to the knowledge, values and skills upon which the process is based. Attention is given to those human services falling under the aegis of social work, the social welfare system and services to special populations. Emphasis is on awareness of human diversity and the importance of examining one’s own values and attitudes.

SOWK 214 Child Welfare: Policies and Services

(Second semester/3 credits) 

An overview of public and private human service organizations that serve children and families. Social policies that affect the welfare of children, and the values upon which these policies are based, will be explored from a historical perspective.

SOSW 217 Juvenile Delinquency

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOWK 201. (First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An examination of major theories and research about the causes of juvenile delinquency and various approaches to its control, prevention and treatment: juvenile court, correctional agencies and community-based programs; and strategies for working with delinquent and at-risk youth.

SOWK 301 Social Policy and Human Service Programs

Prerequisites: SOWK 201 and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

An exploration of the fundamental concepts for analyzing public social welfare policy. The major public social welfare programs will be reviewed and analyzed. Perspectives on poverty in America will also be discussed.

SOWK 327 Gerontological Social Work: Policy and Practice

Prerequisite: SOWK 201 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/3 credits) 

This course introduces students to an in-depth understanding of the issues facing older adults and the public policies and programs created to address these concerns. The goal of this course is to expose students who are either interested in clinical practice with older adults or policy analysis of senior programs to a context in which to examine their interest. In addition to classroom instruction, students will make field visits and get involved with senior services in the local community.

SOWK 330 Social Work with Families

Prerequisite: SOWK 201 or permission of the instructor. (Course is offered as needed/3 credits) 

A study of the family as a psychodynamic group system from a social work perspective. The purpose of this course is to give the student an understanding of the various social work intervention approaches used in helping families.

SOWK 333 The Fields of Social Service

Prerequisite: SOWK 201 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits) 

An examination of social work methods of intervention applicable to various social service settings, such as corrections, substance abuse, health, mental health, family violence, education or care of the elderly. The course offering will examine the roles of the professional and the client in a specific social service setting. This course may be repeated for credit so long as the fields covered are different.

SOWK 342 Social Work Methods I

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, SOWK 201 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/4 credits)

An introduction to and examination of the generalist practice skills necessary for work with individuals. Included are techniques for engaging the client, developing and implementing a treatment plan, working with diverse populations and the value of research in practice. The student will have the opportunity to apply these skills in the subsequent field practice courses.

SOWK 370 Social Work Practicum

Prerequisites: SOWK 201, 301, 342 and permission of the department faculty. (Either semester/3 credits) 

This practicum provides 120 hours of on-site work experience. Students work under the supervision of experienced, professional personnel in a human service agency. Not open to social work majors.

SOWK 375 Independent Study

Prerequisites: SOWK 201, 6 additional credits in social work and permission of the instructor. (Either semester/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

Reading and/or research in a selected field of social work will be required. Each student must submit a typed proposal to the independent study instructor prior to course registration.

SOWK 442 Social Work Methods II

Prerequisite: SOWK 342 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/4 credits)

An examination of theories of planned change and techniques of intervention with families, groups, organizations and communities. Models of practice in mezzo and macro systems will be explored and critically evaluated. Empowerment, anti-oppressive practice, and social justice are emphasized.

SOWK 445A,B and SOWK 446A,B Social Work Field Practice

 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, SOWK 201, 301, 342 and formal acceptance into the social work program. (Both semesters/6 credits each)

A field practicum experience in a social service setting that emphasizes application of social work theories, methods and techniques. Students work under the supervision of experienced professional personnel. Two hundred and ten hours of fieldwork and 15 weekly seminar meetings are required for each semester. Each semester-long course comprises a 4-credit practicum graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis and a 2-credit letter-graded seminar.

 

SOWK 452 Seminar on the Social Work Profession

 

Prerequisites: Formal acceptance into the social work program, senior standing and completion of the major requirements through SOWK 445A, B. (Second semester/4 credits)

An examination of the issues and problems facing social workers entering professional practice. Students learn to integrate and synthesize social work knowledge, values and skills and they have an opportunity to articulate and clarify their professional orientation and style of practice Special attention is paid to critical thinking skills, evaluation of social work programs and practice, preparation for job searching and identification of potential fields of practice that interest the student. The seminar completes the student’s training in the program.

 

SOSW 312 Addictions

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOWK 201 or permission of the instructor. (Second semester—odd years/3 credits)  An examination of current social scientific research and theory about different forms of addiction such as alcohol and other drugs, gambling, pornography, sex, food, and the internet. This is a cross-listed, interdisciplinary course whose main purpose is to give students both a sociological understanding of addiction in its different forms as well as familiarity with current programs, policies, and social work practice models for addressing the problem of addiction.

SOWK 345 The Human Lifecycle and the Social Environment

 

Prerequisites: SOWK 201 and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor.  (First semester/4 credits)

An overview and assessment of theories of human behavior as they relate to the development of individuals from birth to old age. The focus is upon the interplay of biological, psychological and sociocultural factors as they affect and are affected by human behavior, and upon the social systems that influence and are affected by this development.

 

SOC 523 Ethnicity in the United States (Humanities Elective)

(First semester/3 credits) 

A survey of the status and treatment of ethnic groups in the United States: patterns of dominant and subordinate relations; prejudice and discrimination; historical and current problems; demographic and social background; political and social policies. A basic human sciences course.