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Courses Offered

EDUC 204 Foundations of Education in a Diverse Society

Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen (Both semesters/3 credits)

A study of American education today as viewed from historical, philosophical and social perspectives. Emphasis is placed on what constitutes effective teaching and learning. Major themes include productive learning environments, planning for effective instruction, models for instructional delivery and assessment for all learners and teaching within an organizational context. Students in this foundations course demonstrate proficiency in technology productivity and communication skills, as well as safe and ethical uses of technology. Includes a half day per week course-related field experience in a PDS for early childhood education, dual certification in elementary and special education and secondary education. This course is for students considering a major in education. The field placement experience is mandatory.

 

EDUC 223 Child Development

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Not open to freshmen. (Both semesters/3 credits/3 class hours, consecutive laboratory hours of observation) 

A study of human development from conception to the adolescent years of childhood. Emphasis is given to cognitive and personality/social theories of development. Students are expected to understand, analyze, apply, synthesize and evaluate various theories and use them in an analysis of one child. Directed naturalistic observations are conducted in the Onica Prall Child Development Laboratory School, beginning a few weeks into the semester.

 

EDUC 224 Processes and Acquisition of Reading

Prerequisites: EDUC 204 (Both semesters/3 credits)

This course is designed to assist pre-service teachers in understanding the reading acquisition process through observation and analysis of reading and written language development, and the study of current issues in reading research. It is organized around current, accepted, research-based theoretical models that account for individual differences in reading. Introduction to language structures including spoken syllables, phonemes, graphemes and morphemes is included in this course. Participants will apply knowledge of the core areas of language to reading acquisition in terms of first and second language acquisition, typical development and exceptionalities. Participants will be introduced to current scientific research. Course includes a directed one hour per week observation at the Onica Prall Child Development Laboratory School.

 

EDUC 236 Children and Youth with Exceptionalities

Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

A survey of the characteristics and education of students with disabilities and other special needs. Historical perspectives, legislative issues and inclusion will be considered.

 

EDUC 308 Psychological Foundations of Education

 Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSY 101 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Second semester/4 credits)

The psychology of school learning will be explored. There will be an overview of theories of teaching, learning, behavioral management and related research including the philosophical assumptions underlying each, within the dynamics of context, class, race and gender issues; and an explanation of ways of knowing and the many ways that learners construct knowledge. This course includes a half day per week, course-related field experience in a designated secondary Professional Development School (PDS). Course and PDS connections are made through emphasized empirical findings and their implications for the process of schooling.

 

 

EDUC 316 Reading Instruction

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224, EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Both semesters/3 credits)

This course is designed to give the classroom teacher the ability to use a representative array of research-based instructional techniques and strategies in the area of reading. Instructional routines and strategies in the five major components of reading instruction (phonological and phonemic awareness; phonics, spelling and word study; fluency development; vocabulary; and comprehension) suitable for various age and ability groups are emphasized. Throughout the course, students will demonstrate their skill with the instructional routines and strategies by role-play, live demonstrations, critiquing good and inadequate models and reviewing the research support available for those approaches. A half day per week field experience in a professional development school is a requirement of this course.

 

 

 

EDUC 317 Materials for Teaching Reading

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase II. (Both semesters/3 credits)

This course is designed for pre-service teachers. Participants will use criteria consistent with findings of scientific research to select, evaluate and compare instructional programs and materials for teaching reading. Successful students will be proficient in enabling students to become strategic, fluent and independent readers using a variety of texts and reading related materials. They will be prepared to involve families and members of the school and surrounding community to promote reading both inside and outside of school. Must be taken during the Phase II Field Experience.

 

EDUC 320 Science Curriculum, Methods, Materials, and Assessment

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224 and EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Both semesters/3 credits)

An examination of modern elementary science methods and curriculum materials specific to Early Childhood Education and Dual Certification majors using a constructivist-based instructional approach. Emphasis is on curricular innovations and Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics (STEM), including content, process, and discovery and the application of technology to the teaching of science. The philosophical, psychological and structural natures of the various approaches are considered. Must be taken in Phase I.  A half day per week field experience in a professional development school is a requirement of this course.

 

 

EDUC 321 Mathematics Curriculum, Methods, Materials, and Assessment

 

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase II. (Both semesters/4 credits)

An examination of modern materials and methods through a constructivist-based instructional approach. Emphasis is placed on the study of current school practices and the implementation of national and state standards. Methods emphasize appropriate activities at the concrete (manipulative), pictorial and abstract levels. Curricular topics include mathematics as problem solving, communication, reasoning and making connections with the learner’s world.

 

 

EDUC 323 Infants and Toddlers: Foundations and Methods

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224, EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent (Second semester/4 credits)

This course provides the basis for understanding typical and atypical patterns of development from conception through toddlerhood. Valuing the family’s role in their young child’s early development is a major component of this course which explores patterns of family dynamics and keys to building partnerships through effective communication and collaboration techniques. Other major influences on development will also be explored. Course includes a 15-hour per semester course-related experience in an infant/toddler setting. The field placement is mandatory.

 

EDUC 324 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224 and EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. Enrollment limited. (Both semesters/4 credits/3 credits lecture, 1 credit lab) 

A study of philosophies, theories and methods of teaching young children in a preK-3 settings. Students apply the theoretic concepts they are learning in the lecture section of this course during guided teaching in the Onica Prall Child Development Laboratory School and in a professional development school setting. Must be taken during Phase I.

EDUC 330 Social Studies Curriculum, Methods, Materials, and Assessment

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224, EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Both semesters/3 credits)

Appropriate curriculum, methodologies and assessment in teaching social studies in kindergarten and primary education, elementary and special education. Emphasis is on the integration of social studies with language arts and other subject disciplines, including the use of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) with critical and creative thinking skills. Must be taken in Phase I.  A half day per week field experience in a professional development school is a requirement of this course.

 

 

 

 

EDUC 340 Assessment for Reading Instruction

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase II. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

This course is designed to assist pre-service teachers in becoming proficient consumers and users of classroom-based assessments and assessment data. Instruction will focus on building knowledge of the purposes of assessment; types of assessment tools; how to administer and use several valid, reliable, well-researched formal and informal assessments of reading and related skills; how to effectively interpret the results of assessments; and how to communicate assessment results in a variety of contexts. Participants will show that they can use assessment data to guide instructional decisions. Participants will demonstrate their abilities by selecting, administering and/or interpreting assessments appropriate for screening, progress monitoring, diagnosing and outcome measurement.

 

EDUC 347 Classroom Organization and Management

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase II. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

A study of classroom management techniques appropriate for the general and special education classroom. Topics include behavior modification, interaction techniques, problem solving and group management strategies.

 

EDUC 353 Special Education Methods: Elementary School

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224 and EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. May be taken concurrently. (Both semesters/ 3 credits)

A study of procedures for developing and adapting instructional programs to accommodate students with learning and behavioral disabilities in elementary school settings. The course includes examination of curricular models, teaching strategies and instructional materials in academic areas, including the use of assistive technologies and augmentative communication devices. Emphasis placed upon curriculum and methods for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Must be taken in Phase I.  A half day per week field experience in a professional development school is a requirement of this course.

 

EDUC 354 Special Education Methods: Middle School

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224 and EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Both semesters/3 credits)

A study of curriculum objectives, methods and materials of special education for grades 5-8. Course includes examination of curricular models, teaching strategies and instructional materials in academic areas, including the use of assistive technologies and augmentative communication devices. Instructional strategies are discussed in light of current theories and literature. Emphasis placed upon curriculum and methods for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Must be taken in Phase I. A half day per week field experience in a professional development school is a requirement of this course.

 

EDUC 360 Introduction to Teaching Seminar and Internship

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase II. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

A seminar taken during the first semester of the yearlong teaching internship. Early childhood and elementary/special education dual certification interns acquire knowledge and skills to support their transition from students to teachers. Interns demonstrate skills in performance assessment, plan for their own professional development, and provide evidence of effective teaching. The course includes a two and one-half day internship in an assigned PDS classroom. Interns demonstrate skill in the development, planning and implementation of effective lessons in their assigned PDS classroom. Must be taken in Phase II.

 

EDUC 370 Practicum in Reading

Prerequisite: EDUC 316. Open to juniors and seniors. (Summer only/3 credits) 

Supervised work involving continuous diagnosis of disabled readers and the planning and implementation of appropriate corrective/remedial instructional programs. Each student will be placed with one graduate clinician and will work as an apprentice with that clinician assisting in planning, diagnosis, instruction and supervision for a group of students. Weekly conferences with instructor.

 

EDUC 373 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Prescription in Special Education

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224 and EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Both semesters/3 credits)

A study of theoretical and practical aspects of educational evaluation of children and youth with mild/moderate disabilities (learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional disturbance) at the elementary/middle (grades 1-8) age-grade level. Topics include standard and informal procedures for assessing psycholinguistic processes, oral or written language and academic achievement. Report writing and related educational planning are considered. Must be taken in Phase I. A half day per week field experience in a professional development school is a requirement of this course.

 

 

EDUC 375 Independent Study

Prerequisites: 6 credits in education. Open to juniors and seniors. (Both semesters/1, 2 or 3 credits) 

A professional investigation or project evolving from individual interests in education. The project proposal must have the approval of the instructor. Weekly conferences with the instructor.

 

EDUC 399 Internship in Education

Prerequisites: 9 credits in education. (Both semesters/3 or 6 credits) 

Supervised part-time work in educational settings approved by the department. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

EDUC 409 Secondary Reading in the Content Area: Part I

Prerequisites: EDUC 204 and 308. Open only to students enrolled in Phase I of the secondary teacher certification program. (First semester/4 credits)

A study of the major approaches to teaching reading to students in grades 7 to 12. Emphasis on the implementation of reading techniques and strategies appropriate to the content areas, which the secondary teacher can apply toward improving secondary students’ reading skills and their attitude toward reading. Some emphasis on the diagnosis and remediation of certain kinds of reading difficulties is included. Field experiences are required which include observations of teachers and the implementation of instructional strategies to groups of students. 

 

EDUC 411 Educational Methods in Student’s Teaching Field

 

Prerequisites: 18 credits in the major subject, EDUC 412, EDUC 413 and EDUC 445. Open only to students enrolled in Phase II of the secondary teacher certification program. (First semester/3 credits)

This course is designed to provide prospective teachers with a knowledge base of the theories and best practices which are relevant to effective pedagogy as well as current education goals and standards for the content areas: art, English, foreign language, history, mathematics or science. The focus of the course will be on theories and principles of effective instruction— methods, strategies and techniques for teaching students in grades 7-12 (preK-12 for art) in today’s diverse schools. Topics to be explored include lesson planning, motivation, teaching strategies, multiculturalism, critical thinking, the use of technological resources, questioning and problem solving strategies and skills, as well as differentiation of instruction for students with special needs. 

 

 

EDUC 412 Secondary Reading in the Content Area: Part II

Prerequisite: EDUC 409. Open only to students enrolled in Phase I of the secondary teacher certification program. (Second semester/3 credits)

This course is designed to develop competency in the utilization of reading and writing strategies, assessments, vocabulary building, comprehension and special needs adaptations. The secondary certification candidates should be able to demonstrate competency in their knowledge of contemporary theory, wisdom of practice, modeling and analysis and protected practice. Field experiences are required in this course.

 

 

EDUC 413 Secondary Instruction

 Prerequisites: EDUC 204 and 308. Open only to students in Phase I of the secondary teacher certification program. (Second semester/2 credits)

This course is an introduction to a systemic approach to the planning and delivery of secondary school instruction. Candidates will study best practices in instruction and apply them to the creation of lesson plans which include differentiation for meeting individual learning modalities, styles and student needs. Special emphasis on field experiences in a professional development school. 

 

 

EDUC 419 Teaching Internship

Prerequisites: EDUC 411 and EDUC 469. Open only to students enrolled in Phase III of the secondary teacher certification program. (Second semester/8 credits/Extra fee)

Gradual induction into a full semester of directed and evaluated teaching experience in a designated secondary professional development school (PDS). There is an emphasis on discipline-specific planning, implementing and assessing instruction; maintaining learning communities that serve the needs of diverse learners; and a focus on academic and social outcomes.

 

EDUC 445 Secondary Instructional Assessment

Prerequisites: EDUC 204 and EDUC 308. Open only to students in Phase I of the secondary teacher certification program. (Second semester/2 credits)

This course will survey theories and best practices in educational assessment and prepare secondary education candidates to analyze data from school demographics and create, apply and interpret results from preassessment, formative, summative and standardized assessment instruments to improve instruction and student achievement. 

 

 

EDUC 449 Teaching Internship in Elementary/Special Education

Prerequisite: Admittance to Phase III. (Both semesters/12 credits/Extra fee)

Supervised teaching in special education programs for students with mild/moderate disabilities (learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional disturbance). Students may complete one placement in an elementary school special education program and one placement in a middle school special education program. Must be taken in Phase III of the elementary/special education program.

 

EDUC 459 Teaching Internship in Kindergarten and Primary Grades

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase III. (Both semesters/6 credits in kindergarten, 6 credits in primary/ Extra fee)

The final semester of teaching internship. A semester-long program of guided observation, participation and supervised teaching. Students complete one full-time placement in kindergarten and one full-time placement in a primary grade (1, 2 or 3). Must be taken in Phase III of the Early Childhood Education Program.

 

EDUC 460 Professional Development Seminar

Prerequisite: Admission to Phase III. (Both semesters/3 credits) 

A culminating seminar taken with the final phase of the yearlong teaching internship. Candidates in the Early Childhood and Dual Certification Programs will analyze their roles and their development as teachers as they implement professional practices learned during the earlier phases of their programs. Interns will complete the exit folio to document their performance and professional development as teachers. Must be taken in Phase III.

EDUC 469 Inclusion and Instruction

Prerequisites: EDUC 412, EDUC 413 and EDUC 445. Open only to students enrolled in Phase II of the secondary teacher certification program. (First semester/3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to strategies for differentiating instruction within the general education classrooms. The course examines the legal, philosophical and programmatic underpinnings of instructional inclusion, broadly defined. Addressed in the course are approaches for adapting the curriculum, especially in the areas of reading, writing and mathematics, to meet the needs of students with identified disabilities (e.g., learning disabled, emotionally impaired, speech and language impaired, intellectually disabled). 

 

EDUC 302 Differentiating Instruction in the Primary Classroom (K-3)

Prerequisites: EDUC 204, EDUC 223, EDUC 224 and EDUC 236 and passage of Praxis I or the equivalent. (Second semester/3 credits) 

This course focuses on differentiating instruction in primary classrooms (kindergarten-grade 3). Classrooms in the 21st century are more diverse than ever before. Teachers are responsible for meeting the needs of all students in their classrooms. This course provides an in-depth look at research-based principles and strategies for differentiating instruction and gives students opportunities to apply their understandings to specific populations including English language learners, students with special needs and gifted/talented students. This course is open to Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education/Special Education majors in Phase 1, Phase II or Phase III.

EDUC 400 Phase II Seminar on Classroom Management

Prerequisite: EDUC 445 (First semester/1 credit)

Course participants examine and apply basic elements of classroom management at the secondary level. This course accompanies the Phase II internship, a directed and evaluated teaching experience in a designated secondary PDS. In this seminar, there is emphasis on learning about instructional and behavioral management through observation of experienced teachers and systematic reflection on experiences within the framework of the InTASC Standards. (Open only to students enrolled in Phase II of the secondary teacher certification program.)

EDUC 401 Phase III Seminar on Becoming a Teacher

Prerequisite: EDUC 445. Open only to students enrolled in Phase III of the secondary teacher certification program. (Second semester/4 credits)  This course accompanies the Phase III Teaching Internship (EDUC 419), a directed and evaluated teaching experience in a designated secondary Professional Development School (PDS), for a full semester. In this seminar, there is an emphasis on honing the craft of teaching at the secondary level through implementing unit and lesson plans for student learning. Within the framework of the InTASC Standards and content area standards, course participants engage in a forum about professional issues for becoming a teacher, such as planning instruction, interacting with and assessing students, working with staff and parents/caregivers, and engaging the community to facilitate student learning. Guidance about certification and professional job searches are also covered. Candidates develop the Secondary Exit Folio as a final representative product of the successful teaching internship.

EDUC 502 Technology for Literacy, Leaderhship and Learning

Prerequisite: This course has no prerequisite but students are expected to have some familiarity withpersonal computer operating procedures including using Windows and a word processor. (Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course examines what educational leaders (reading specialists, administrators, and teachers) need to know in order to enhance the school program through the use of technology. An emphasis on adaptive, administrative, and instructive use of technology as a means to plan and teach instruction, assess data, and communicate information in order to promote student learning at the classroom, school, and district levels will be a large focus of this course. Students are required to take this as the first course in the Reading Specialist, Educational Leadership, and Curriculum and Instruction programs.

EDUC 511 Children’s Literature

(Summer session—odd years/3 credits) 

A survey of children’s literature and enrichment materials and the criteria for evaluating and selecting such materials as they relate to the needs, interests and capabilities of children and young people.

EDUC 513 School Law

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course examines current legal issues facing educational leaders. Specific areas studied include constitutional rights of students, legal aspects of discipline, tort liability and special education law. Constitutional, federal and state law will be examined within each topic area.

EDUC 514 Administration of Student Services

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course examines the pupil services component of educational administration. Specific areas studied include pupil services administrative theory, major components of student services administration and providing services for students with special needs, including those with educational disabilities. Relevant legal aspects of pupil services and special education will be discussed.

EDUC 515 Processes and Acquisition of Reading

(Second semester—even years/3 credits)

This course is designed to assist teachers in understanding the reading acquisition process through observation and analysis of reading and written language development, and the study of current issues in reading research. It is organized around current, accepted, research-based theoretical models that account for individual differences in reading. Introduction to language structures including spoken syllables, phonemes, graphemes and morphemes is included in this course. Participants will apply knowledge of the core areas of language to reading acquisition in terms of first and second language acquisition, typical development and exceptionalities. Participants will be introduced to current scientific research.

EDUC 516 Mentoring Beginning Teachers: Principles and Practices

Prerequisite: Three years of successful classroom teaching. (Offered as needed/3 credits) 

This course explores the challenges facing beginning teachers (both in-service and intern- teachers), research on the continuum of teacher development, approaches to effective teacher induction and on-going support. Participants will develop strategies and techniques for mentoring beginning teachers.

EDUC 517 Materials for Teaching Reading: Instruction and Methods

Prerequisite: EDUC 515 or the equivalent. (First semester/3 credits) 

An introductory reading course emphasizing the historical perspectives of reading instruction, developmental programs and specific reading skills needed at elementary and secondary levels. Selection and evaluation of various media for teaching reading at the elementary level will be the focus of this course. Involvement of other members of the educational community and parents in the reading program will also be considered.

EDUC 518 Reading Instruction: Elementary

Prerequisite: EDUC 515 or the equivalent. (First semester/3 credits) 

Concerns the remediation and prevention of reading difficulties and the appropriate placement and program planning for disabled, grade level and gifted readers. The course includes a balanced literacy program of graphophonics, semantics and syntactics in teaching reading. Topics include word recognition, reading comprehension, balanced literacy program, intervention strategies and establishing and managing the literacy program. In-school experiences are required which include observations of teachers and the implementationinstructional strategies to groups of students.

EDUC 519 Reading Instruction: Secondary

Prerequisite: EDUC 515 or the equivalent. (Second semester/3 credits) 

A study of the principles and methods of teaching reading and the appropriate match of students with materials and teaching strategies at the middle school, junior high and senior high levels. Content area needs, study skills and appropriate skill remediation and refinement will be explored. In-school experiences are required which include observations of teachers and the implementation of instructional strategies to groups of students.

EDUC 520 Reading Diagnosis

Prerequisite: EDUC 515 or the equivalent. (Second semester/3 credits) 

A course designed to acquaint students with a variety of reading disabilities, their possible etiologies and initial diagnostic procedures. Strategies for identifying gifted readers and for measuring general reading achievement will be addressed. Emphasis will be on the construction of informal reading inventories; the assessment of commercial instruments; the uses of assessment data from state, local and classroom assessments; and thassessment results to parents and school personnel.

EDUC 521 Contemporary Issues in the Teaching of Reading

Prerequisite: EDUC 515 or permission of the instructor. (First semester/3 credits) 

Emphasizes implications of current theory and results of research for the teaching of reading. Attention is given to issues and problems in the area of reading instruction. An action research project is planned and implemented during the semester. Current issues associated with reading education are also discussed.

EDUC 523 Reading Diagnosis and Prescription: Clinical

Prerequisites: EDUC 517, 518, 519 and 520, or permission of the instructor. (Second semester/3 credits) 

The identification of disabled readers and appropriate prescriptive program planning will be emphasized. Includes the interpretation of initial screening results and subsequent recommendations. Instructional materials for individual and small group teaching will be developed and specific remedial techniques will be refined.

EDUC 524 Advanced Clinical Reading Experiences: Elementary

Prerequisite: EDUC 523 or permission of the instructor. (Offered only in summer sessions/3 credits) 

This supervised practicum involves the continuous diagnosis of disabled readers and the planning and implementation of appropriate corrective/remedial programs. Three weeks are spent working with elementary age students. A seminar component is an integral part of the course. To be taken concurrently with EDUC 525.

EDUC 525 Advanced Clinical Reading Experiences: Secondary

Prerequisite: EDUC 523 or permission of the instructor. (Offered only in summer sessions/3 credits) 

This supervised practicum involves the continuous diagnosis of disabled readers and the planning and implementation of appropriate corrective/remedial programs with an emphasis on the implementation of reading techniques and strategies appropriate to the content areas. Three weeks are spent working with secondary-age students. A seminar cintegral part of the course. To be taken concurrently with EDUC 524.

EDUC 527 Use of Alphabetic Phonics in Language Arts Instruction

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

The study of dyslexia and reading disability, the reading process and the unique needs of students with learning/language difficulties. Phonological awareness, the principles of multisensory instruction through the Alphabetic Phonics system and current research in the field of reading will be primary focuses. Integration of explicit phonics into language arts instruction will be explored.

EDUC 529 Literacy Leadership

Prerequisites: EDUC 515 (or equivalent), 517, 518, 519 and 520. (First semester/3 credits) 

This course examines effective school-wide literacy programs and the role the reading specialist/literacy coach plays in those programs. The course addresses change theory, working with the adult learner, time management and organization associated with professional development and the role of a reading specialist/literacy coach. Students will use district and/ or building level assessments and observation to evaluate and develop an improvement plan for the school wide literacy program.

EDUC 533 Effective Home-School Interaction: Research and Practice

(First semester/3 credits) 

The dynamics of the family-teacher-child relationship with emphasis on the teacher’s role as partner and counselor of children ages 3-12. Techniques for working with family and children will be evaluated and designed by the teacher.

EDUC 534 Current Issues in Early Childhood and Elementary Education

(Second semester/3 credits) 

A review and analysis of current research in early childhood and elementary education with emphasis on issues,emerging trends and procedures essential to developing classroom programs for children.

EDUC 535 Integrating the Elementary Curriculum through Language Arts

(Summer—even years/3 credits) 

Emphasis on integrating language arts in areas of the elementary school curriculum. Techniques and practical activities for developing skills such as listening, speaking, literature, writing, comprehension and vocabulary development will form the core of the course.

EDUC 540 Modern Science Methods

(Summer—even years/3 credits) 

An examination of modern elementary and middle school science methods, curriculum materials and instructional strategies. Emphasis will be placed upon national, state and local science standards and exemplary curriculum materials. The philosophical, psychological and structural bases for the various teaching approaches and materials are considered.

EDUC 542 Topics in Elementary and Middle School Physical Science

(First semester—odd years/3 credits) 

A consideration of the processes and topics of physical science that are most appropriate to the needs of elementary and middle school teachers. An activity-centered approach is utilized tostudy the structure of matter and other physical science topics.

EDUC 544 Topics in Elementary and Middle School Biological Science

(First semester—even years/3 credits) 

A consideration of the processes and topics of biological science that are most appropriate to the needs of elementary and middle school teachers. An activity-centered approach is utilized to study topics of biological science. Coursework emphasizes collection, identification, and culturing methods adapted to elementary and middle school science programs.

EDUC 545 Modern Mathematics Methods

(Summer/3 credits) 

An examination of modern elementary mathematics methods, curriculum materials and instructional strategies. Emphasis is placed upon national, state and local mathematics standards and exemplary curriculum and manipulative materials. The philosophical, psychological and structural bases for the various teaching approaches and materials are considered.

EDUC 546 The Teaching of Numbers, Operations and Algebraic Thinking in Elementary and Middle School

Prerequisite: Current teaching certification (Second semester—even years/3 credits) 

An in-depth study of the teaching of numbers, operations, and algebraic thinking in elementary and middle schools. Focus areas include how students learn numbers, operations, and algebraic thinking; ways to assess students’ knowledge of these content areas; some of the difficulties students have with these content areas; and ways that teachers can help students overcome these difficulties.

EDUC 548 Topics in Elementary and Middle School Earth Science

(Offered as needed/3 credits) 

A consideration of the processes and topics of earth science that are most appropriate to the needs of elementary and middle school teachers. Emphasis is placed upon an activity-centered study of three major areas in earth science (astronomy, geology, meteorology).

EDUC 551 The Teaching of Geometry

Prerequisites: MATH 501 or equivalent and current teaching certification. (First semester—odd years/3 credits)  

This course examines current research and accepted practices in teaching geometry in the secondary school, based on national and state standards. The focus is on problem solving and mathematical reasoning, communication, and integrating geometry with other disciplines. Students will learn to use appropriate instructional materials, including technology, to support the teaching and learning of geometry.

EDUC 552 The Teaching of Algebra

Prerequisite: MATH 502 or equivalent and current teaching certification. (First semester—even years/3 credits)  

This course examines current research and accepted practices in teaching algebra in the secondary school, based on national and state standards. The focus is on problem solving and mathematical reasoning, communication, and integrating algebra with other disciplines. Students will learn to use appropriate instructional materials, including technology, to support the teaching and learning of algebra.

EDUC 561 Teaching Diverse Learners in an Inclusive Setting

(Second semester/3 credits) 

Designed to develop skills, attitudes and understanding to enable the general early childhood, elementary and secondary classroom teacher to educate learners with special needs effectively. Topics include inclusion, educational provisions for teaching the child with disabilities, educational planning, the team process, teaching techniques, student assessment and classroom organization and management skills. Sections taught in the PDS are open to students in the initial teaching certificate program.

EDUC 565 Classroom Organization and Management in Special Education

(First semester/3 credits) 

Classroom management and teaching techniques for students in general and special education settings; behavior modification, interaction techniques, self-management strategies and motivation strategies.

EDUC 571 Historical, Philosophical and Legal Foundations of Special Education

(Summer/3 credits) 

Historical and legal perspectives that led to PL 94-142 and subsequent legislation. Current issues in the field of special education; survey of disabilities, philosophical concerns, educational ramifications of legislation and innovative programming.

EDUC 573 Assessment, Diagnosis and Prescription in Special Education

(Second semester/3 credits) 

Theoretical and practical aspects of assessment, diagnosis and prescription of children with mild or moderate disabilities. Emphasis on standardized and informal procedures for assessing psycholinguistic processes, oral and written language and academic achievement. Corresponding implications for educational programming are considered. Appropriate test selection and comprehensive report writing are included.

EDUC 574 Curriculum and Methods in Special Education: Reading, Language Arts and Social Studies

(First semester/3 credits) 

A study of curriculum goals and objectives, and the methods and materials to be employed with children who have mild or moderate disabilities. Topics include learning processes and development of instructional programs in reading, spelling, oral and written language and social studies.

EDUC 576 Curriculum and Methods in Special Education: Mathematics and Science

(Second semester/3 credits) 

A study of curriculum goals and objectives and the methods and materials to be employed with children who have mild or moderate disabilities. Topics include development of instructional programs in mathematics and science.

EDUC 577 Introduction to Educational Research

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course prepares the student to become an effective consumer of educational research. Library assignments include using a variety of tools and technology to search and retrieve research documents. Categories of research include quantitative, qualitative, experimental, survey and action. Topics include research design, analysis of internal and external validity and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students enrolled in the M.S. Degree Programs in Educational Leadership and Curriculum and Instruction are encouraged to complete this course within the first 12 credits; students enrolled in the M.S. Degree in Reading Specialization are encouraged to complete this course within the first 9 credits.

EDUC 578 Educational Leadership and Group Dynamics

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course examines leadership theory; organizational theory including the structure and dynamics of organizations; motivation and decision-making processes examining the hierarchy of authority within the organization; the interaction of various groups in the decision-making process; communication skills; the various communication networks and their impact upon the different groups within the organization; organizational change focusing on the group culture and dynamics and its impact on the efforts of the leadership to promote change within the organization. Students have the opportunity to meet with educational leaders to discuss challenges in educational leadership.

EDUC 581 Research-Based Teaching, Learning and Assessment

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course extends students’ knowledge, understanding and application of theories of child development and the teaching-learning-assessment process, and offers the student the opportunity to carefully consider and apply the findings of educational, psychological and brain-based research and theory. A semester-long case study of one subject of the student’s choice helps the student to thoughtfully apply the results of the research to his/her teaching practice, collect data to document change in the subject’s academic or social behavior and skillfully analyze and reflect on the outcomes of the case study.(Students enrolled in the M.S. Degree Programs in Educational Leadership and Curriculum and Instruction are encouraged to complete this course within the first 12 credits)

EDUC 582 Educational Philosophy in a Diverse Society

(Both semesters/3 credits) 

This course studies the educational philosophies of idealism, realism, pragmatism, reconstructionism and existentialism in the context of diverse educational populations. Multicultural curriculum planning approaches as well as the history and contributions of minority groups to American education are also examined. (Students enrolled in the M.S. Degree Programs in Educational Leadership and Curriculum and Instruction are required to complete this course within the first 12 credits; students enrolled in the M.S. Degree Program in Reading Specialization are encouraged to complete this course within the first 9 credits.)

EDUC 583 Principles of Curriculum Development and Appraisal

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

This course examines various approaches to curriculum development and evaluation. Curriculum theories, processes and roles in curriculum planning; data used in curriculum planning; and defining curricular goals and objectives are all addressed in the course.

EDUC 584 Systemic Change Processes for School Improvement

(Summer and both semesters/3 credits) 

Participants examine the literature on systemic change, with emphasis on models and strategies for use by school leaders to effect change at the individual, team, school and district levels. Topics include charateristics and dynamics of effective organization, power and influence patterns in schools and communities and leadership roles in planning and managing school improvement. Participants apply concepts to effect change in the workplace.

EDUC 586 Principles of Educational Supervision

Prerequisites: EDUC 513, EDUC 514, EDUC 578, EDUC 583 and EDUC 584. (Both semesters/ 3 credits) 

This course examines educational supervision as a function of the school leader. Specific areas studied include classroom observation skills, conferencing skills, evaluation skills and human relations skills. Students have the opportunity to practice supervisory skills in simulated and on-site applications.

EDUC 587 Elementary School Administrative Internship

Prerequisites: EDUC 578, EDUC 583 and EDUC 586. (First and second semesters for a full year/ 3 credits) 

This course is a yearlong internship experience (beginning in the fall and concluding in the spring) with a practicing elementary school principal for a range of administrative experiences for a minimum of 280 clock hours in the field for the yearlong internship. The culmination of the experience will result in the submission of an administrative portfolio which will allow the development of the intern to be evaluated by college faculty and, where possible, by a public school administrator. The course will also include class experiences with case studies and vignettes of administrative dilemmas and problems.

EDUC 588 Secondary School Administrative Internship

Prerequisites: EDUC 578, EDUC 583 and EDUC 586. (First and second semesters for a full year/ 3 credits) 

This course is a yearlong internship experience (beginning in the fall and concluding in the spring) with a practicing secondary school principal for a range of administrative experiences for a minimum of 280 clock hours in the field. The culmination of the experience will result in the submission of an administrative portfolio which will allow the development of the intern to be evaluated by college faculty and, where possible, by a public school administrator. The course will also include class experiences and vignettes with case studies of administrative dilemmas and problems.

EDUC 589 School Business and Personnel Administration

Prerequisites: EDUC 578 and EDUC 586. (First semester and summer/3 credits) 

This course examines administrative functions in the school business and personnel areas. Specific topics examined include revenue and budgeting; school maintenance and operations; comprehensive strategic planning; personnel recruitment, selection, induction and development; and appraisal of personnel performance.

EDUC 595 The Teaching of Statistics and Probability—Decision Making with Mathematics

Prerequisites: MATH 500 or equivalent and current teaching certification. (Second semester—even years/3 credits) 

This course examines current research and accepted practices in teaching statistics and probability in the secondary school, based on national and state standards. The focus is on 354 GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS problem solving and mathematical reasoning, communication, and integrating statistics and probability with other disciplines. Students will learn to use appropriate instructional materials, including technology, to support the teaching and learning of statistics and probability.

EDUC 596 The Teaching of Mathematical Modeling—Strategies for Contemporary Problems

Prerequisites: MATH 505 or equivalent and current teaching certification. (Second semester— odd years/3 credits)  

This course examines current research and accepted practices in teaching mathematical modeling in the secondary school, based on national and state standards. The focus is on problem solving through mathematical modeling and mathematical reasoning, communication, and integrating mathematics with other disciplines. Students will learn to use appropriate instructional materials, including technology, to support the teaching and learning of mathematical modeling.

EDUC 597 Action Research/Special Project

Prerequisite: Permission of the program director. (First and second semesters for a full year/3 credits) 

Implementation of an action research special project in learning and teaching. Choice is made individually with the course instructor. The action research work is completed in two semesters, beginning in the fall and ending in the spring with a presentation of the findings. It is expected that students will complete a thorough literature review of their topics, clarify a hypothesis about a solution to a learning and teaching classroom problem, collect baseline data related to the problem, design an intervention program, monitor the intervention program being implemented, test the effect of their proposed solution and reflect and generalize about future actions.

EDUC 547 The Teaching of Geometry and Measurement in Elementary and Middle School

Prerequisite: Current teaching certification (Second semester—odd years/3 credits) 

An in-depth study of the teaching of geometry and measurement in elementary and middle schools. Focus areas include how students learn geometry and measurement; ways to assess students' knowledge of these content areas; some of the difficulties students have with these content areas; and ways that teachers can help students overcome these difficulties.

EDMA 579 Capstone Project

 

<p><em>Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credits in the M.S. in Mathematics Education program. (3 credits/Either semester)</em>&#160;</p>

<p>The capstone project is the culminating experience of the M.S. in Mathematics Education; it is required of each student in the high school track and recommended for students in the middle school track. Each project will focus on an idea that links mathematics to its teaching and learning. It will involve independent reading and study, reflection, writing, and perhaps action research. The capstone is assigned a letter grade, which will reflect not only the quality of the final product, but also the student’s performance throughout the project.</p>